Pulp Crazy – Totem and Taboo by Philip José Farmer

In this weeks episode I will be discussing Totem and Taboo by Philip José Farmer. February 25, 2015 marked six years since the passing of this enormous talent, so I decided to read one of his stories in remembrance of him. By coincidence, or fate, a copy of The Grand Adventure arrived in the mail on the 25th. These is a beautifully illustrated collection published by Byron Preiss and Berkley Books, which contains some PJF stories I’ve been dying to read. The Totem and Taboo title caught my interest, and after reading Farmer’s introduction to it, I just had to read it. The story itself isn’t very long, Farmer’s introduction is nearly as long as the story itself. But he conveys some interesting points and background material in the introduction.

Totem and Taboo combines two of Farmer’s interests, Psychotherapy and Totems. The name of the story being identical to a thesis by Sigmund Freud isn’t a coincidence. In the introduction, Farmer says this story has nothing to do with Freud’s thesis, but then again he also says it might after all. Farmer had an interest in psychotherapy and psychology, which played a big part in his World of Tiers novel, Red Orc’s Rage.

PJF also gives some serious thoughts about animals towards the beginning of the intro, as well as comparing and contrasting their actions to humans. This kind of thinking is seen from him in other works relating to feral humans. Of course, totems play a part of the Khokarsa series, with Hadon of Ancient Opar being a member of the Ant Totem, and Kwasin of Dythbeth being a member of the Thunder Bear totem.

According to Farmer, at the conclusion of his intro, no psychologist or psychoanalyst, as far as he was aware had combined zoology with their particular school of theory or technique. Farmer mused that maybe they should look into this.

Links:

Totem & Taboo at ISFDB: http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?58170

Philip José Farmer on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Philip-Jose-Farmer/e/B000APAEPG/

The Grand Adventure on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Grand-Adventure-Philip-Jose-Farmer/dp/0425072118/

The Book of Philip José Farmer on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Book-Philip-Jos%C3%A9-Farmer/dp/B0006F1Q1G/

Official Philip José Farmer Website: http://pjfarmer.com

Meteor House Press:  http://meteorhousepress.com

Pulp Crazy – Brotherhood of the Wolf

 

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/101.mp3

This weeks episode was inspired by my talk with Jean-Marc Lofficier of Black Coat Press last week. During Jean-Marc’s discussion of French Cinema, he mentioned Brotherhood of the Wolf, or Le Pacte des Loups. This is one of my favorite cult movies, so I thought I would re-watch it and do an episode on it this week. I wouldn’t call it a pulp movie, but it certainly would be at home in Weird Tales magazine, and the lead characters could have their own series in Adventure magazine.

Brotherhood of the Wolf is a historical horror/action movie directed by Christophe Gans, based on the Beast of Gevaudan. It was released in January 2001 in France, and came out here in the US in September 2001.

The King sends his Royal Taxidermist and knight, Grégoire de Fronsac played wonderfully by Samuel Le Bihan to investigate and identify the beast. De Fronsac is a well traveled guy, having been to the Americas. He’s a naturalist, soldier, and a very talented artist. Accompanying De Fronsac is his Iroquois friend, Mani, who is of the Mohawk tribe. Mani is De Fronsac’s best friend and blood brother. Mani is played by Mark Dacascos, and his martial arts abilities are utilized in the film.

The film seems to be out of print, but some vendors are still selling copies on Amazon.

Links:

Brotherhood of the Wolf on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Brotherhood-Wolf-Christophe-Gans/dp/B00006ADEM

Pulp Crazy Episode 100 – French Pulp Fiction with Jean-Marc Lofficier

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/100.mp3

In this special 100th episode of Pulp Crazy, I’m joined by Jean-Marc Lofficier of Black Coat Press. Jean-Marc, a writer, editor, and publisher has a vast knowledge of what has come to be known as French Pulp Fiction. Jean-Marc takes us through history and describes the authors, characters, and concepts pioneered in French popular literature. We also discuss the catalog of Black Coat Press, and Jean-Marc discusses some of the titles they have released, and what is coming down the pipeline. All of this, plus French movie serials, cinema, and even some Philip Jose Farmer talk are thrown into the mix.

It was a pleasure to have Jean-Marc on the show, and I’m grateful he agreed to come on and share his knowledge about French Pulp Fiction.

 

Links:

Black Coat Press: http://www.blackcoatpress.com/

Black Coat Press on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Black-Coat-Press/337697694704?ref=mf

The French Wold Newton Universe: http://www.coolfrenchcomics.com/wnu1.htm

Cool French Comics: http://www.coolfrenchcomics.com/

Black Coat Press on Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/bcamazonkindle

Jean-Marc Lofficier at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-Marc_Lofficier

Jean-Marc Lofficier at ComicBookDB: http://comicbookdb.com/creator.php?ID=6001

 

 

Pulp Crazy – The Pit of the Serpent by Robert E. Howard

 

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/099.mp3

In this weeks episode I will be discussing The Pit of the Serpent by Robert E. Howard. The Pit of the Serpent was first published in the July 1929 issue of Fight Stories, and is now in the public domain. It is the first published tale featuring Sailor Steve Costigan, one of Howard’s most popular characters. The story takes place in the Philippines, Manila to be precise. I would also say it takes place around the year it was first published, 1929.

 

Links:
The Pit of the Serpent at Project Gutenberg Australia: http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks06/0607341h.html

 

The Pit of the Serpent at Wikisource: http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Pit_of_the_Serpent

 

The Robert E. Howard Foundation: http://www.rehfoundation.org/

 

Official Robert E. Howard Forums:  http://www.conan.com/invboard/