Tag Archives: Edgar Rice Burroughs

Dum-Dum 2016 – Philip José Farmer’s Ancient Opar Series

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/cpcdumdum2016.mp3

 

Christopher Paul Carey (co-author of THE SONG OF KWASIN with Philip José Farmer) discusses Farmer’s Ancient Opar Series at the 2016 Dum-Dum in Morris, IL, hosted by the Burroughs Bibliophiles.

A note from Christopher Paul Carey: I would like to correct two minor errors I made in my Dum-Dum talk. One, the Ancient Opar series is set 12,000 years ago (not 10,000 years ago). Two, Frank Brueckel’s last name is properly pronounced “Breckel” (not “Broy-kel”). I can only blame stage fright and lack of sleep for these mistakes, as I was well aware at the time of both facts.

http://www.burroughsbibliophiles.com/

http://cpcarey.com

http://www.erbzine.com/mag57/5752.html

http://meteorhousepress.com

http://khokarsa.com

Pulp Crazy – The God of Tarzan by Edgar Rice Burroughs

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/152.mp3

 

In this week’s episode I discuss “The God of Tarzan” by Edgar Rice Burroughs. This is a short story typically read in the Jungle Tales of Tarzan collection by Edgar Rice Burroughs. The story deals with a 19 year old Tarzan’s quest to find God after reading the term in the dictionary.

Links:

Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs – http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/6532

The Return of Tarzan by Edgar Rice Burroughs – http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/8752

Jungle Tales of Tarzan
by Edgar Rice Burroughs – http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/8758

Mother Was a Lovely Beast – http://www.pjfarmer.com/edit.htm

http://edgarriceburroughs.com

http://tarzan.com

 

Review: Blood of Ancient Opar by Christopher Paul Carey

Bob Eggleton's cover to Blood of Ancient Opar

Bob Eggleton’s cover to Blood of Ancient Opar

Last year I was lucky to obtain an advanced reader copy of Hadon, King of Opar by Christopher Paul Carey before its release at PulpFest 2015. PulpFest 2016 is just around the corner and once again Meteor House provided Pulp Crazy with an advanced reader copy of the latest novella in Philip Jose Farmer’s Khokarsa (Ancient Opar) series, Blood of Ancient Opar by Christopher Paul Carey.

Blood of Ancient Opar picks up immediately following the massive cliffhanger of Hadon, King of Opar. Hadon and his allies have triumphed over the forces of the Mikawaru pirates who had invaded Opar in Hadon, King of Opar (with the Priests of Resu and the Oracle of Kho assisting the raiders), but Hadon’s troubles are far from over.

His daughter La reveals an ancient prophecy to Hadon and the two of them spend the rest of the novella trying to make sense of it and use it to their advantage against an emerging threat.

Blood of Ancient Opar is a fast-paced adventure that once again has the reader side-by-side with Hadon throughout the course of the story. This is one of those tales that is tough to review, as I don’t want to spoil some major events that occur in the book, but I can discuss some portions.

During the course of the book, Hadon finds himself in the valley adjoining Opar, the Valley of the Royals. Here, Hadon visits the Palace of Queens, which readers of Tarzan and the Golden Lion will likely find very familiar. The wonderful cover painting by Bob Eggleton depicts this event. The chapters set at the royal retreat were some of my favorites, as it was fun to visit an all-new location in Ancient Opar alongside Hadon.

On a grimmer note, needless to say, before the events of Hadon, King of Opar, the queendom was already facing hard times. As Blood of Ancient Opar begins, the city is in an even worse situation. Hadon and La really have their work cut out for them if they hope to get Opar back on track.

Using Farmer’s notes, Carey skillfully executes the kind of fantasy adventure tale you just don’t see much of anymore. His contributions to the Khokarsa/Ancient Opar series feel right at home sitting beside Farmer’s original Ancient Opar books on my bookshelf and I feel fortunate to see the series continue in such great hands. Blood of Ancient Opar is everything I hoped it would be.

This is a tale of heroic fantasy skillfully brought to life through the pen and mind of a writer intimately familiar with the source material. Blood of Ancient Opar hearkens back to classic sword and sorcery adventures of the past while displaying a mastery of modern fiction writing. One thing thing is for sure, readers familiar with Opar will never look at the lost city the same way again.

Blood of Ancient Opar will be debut July 21st at PulpFest 2016 / FarmerCon XI in Columbus, Ohio. The novella is available for preorder in both softcover and hardcover formats at http://meteorhousepress.com/blood-of-ancient-opar/ . It’s highly recommend you preorder now if you want to guarantee a copy. Meteor House is also offering the remaining copies of Hadon, King of Opar for sale as well. The two novellas can be purchased together while supplies last.

Pulp Crazy – Blood of Ancient Opar with Christopher Paul Carey

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/150.mp3

Christopher Paul Carey joins me in discussing his latest novella, Blood of Ancient Opar. This is the latest installment of Philip José Farmer’s  Ancient Opar series and is a must read for all fans of Opar. Today (6/15/2016) is the last day to preorder the book at http://meteorhousepress.com/blood-of-ancient-opar/ and have your name in the acknowledgments. You can preorder after 6/15/2016, but it’s highly recommend you preorder now if you want to guarantee yourself a copy.

Links:

Purchase Blood of Ancient Opar: http://meteorhousepress.com/blood-of-ancient-opar/

Previous Discussions with Christopher Paul Carey on Ancient Opar: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLuJQWW7HwryGrGGcaBlImOFOJpjO-xO3K

Christopher Paul Carey Website: http://cpcarey.com

Christopher Paul Carey Twitter: http://twitter.com/cpcarey

Explore the World of Lost Khokarsa: http://www.pjfarmer.com/khokarsa/khokarsa.htm

The Official Philip José Farmer Website: http://pjfarmer.com

Pulp Crazy – The Master Mind of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/149.mp3

In this week’s episode I discuss the sixth book in the Barsoom saga, The Master Mind of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs.

Mars will be close to Earth on May 30th – http://www.space.com/33014-mars-closest-approach-2016-on-monday.html

Edgar Rice Burroughs Website: https://www.edgarriceburroughs.com/

ERBzine – http://erbzine.com/

The John Carter Files – http://thejohncarterfiles.com/

Pulp Crazy – Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/134.mp3

Hello everyone and welcome to this week’s episode of Pulp Crazy. I’m your host, Jason Aiken. In this week’s episode I’m going to be discussing Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens. This film was released nationwide in the United States on December 17, 2015. I will devote this last Pulp Crazy episode of 2015 to reviewing and discussing the film. I figured it would be appropriate for Pulp Crazy because George Lucas didn’t create Star Wars in a vacuum. The pulp science fantasy works of Edgar Rice Burroughs, E. E. ’Doc’ Smith, and Leigh Brackett are without a doubt in the D.N.A. of Star Wars.
SPOILERS AHOY! I can’t critique this movie honestly without mentioning a few things about it. So you’ve been warned, I wouldn’t watch this until after you’ve seen the film, unless you don’t care about spoilers.

Wold Newton Day 12/13/2015 – The Adventure of the Peerless Peer by Philip José Farmer

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/133.mp3

Today, December 13, 2015 is the 220th anniversary of the Wold Newton event. On December 13, 1795, a meteorite struck outside the hamlet of Wold Newton in Yorkshire, England. According to Philip José Farmer, when the meteorite crashed into the countryside, two carriages were passing by. The drivers and passengers, who were already of heroic stock, were exposed to the ionization of the meteorite and were further enhanced by it.

These passengers include Sir Percy Blakeny, the Scarlet Pimpernel as well as Fitzwilliam and Elizabeth Darcy. Ancestors of Sherlock Holmes, Tarzan, Doc Savage, the Avenger, the Shadow, the Spider, and others were present as well. The passengers included several married couples, with some of the women already being pregnant at the time. Their children would later marry each other, thus the enriched genes would not become recessive. Due to the families becoming interconnected, they are referred to as one family, the Wold Newton Family.

Today also marks the day of the launch of WOLDNEWTONFAMILY.COM. A website devoted to the canonical Wold Newton Family works by Philip José Farmer and authorized continuations. Be sure to take some time and give it a peek on Wold Newton Day, it has several articles, and is a great introduction and resource to Philip José Farmer’s Wold Newton Family.

In this week’s episode, I look at a seminal Wold Newton tale, “The Adventure of the Peerless Peer” by Philip José Farmer himself. This story features Sherlock Holmes, Doctor Watson, and Tarzan, with several cameos by other pulp heroes.

Links:

Wold Newton Family.com: http://woldnewtonfamily.com

The Official Philip José Farmer Website: http://pjfarmer.com

Purchase The Adventure of the Peerless Peer on Amazon (hardcopy and ebook): http://www.amazon.com/Further-Adventures-Sherlock-Holmes-Peerless/dp/0857681206/

Purchase The Adventure of the Peerless Peer on B&N.com (paperback and ebook):  http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/further-adventures-of-sherlock-holmes-philip-jose-farmer/1100310919?ean=9780857681201

Dennis Powers’ essay: “Jungle Brothers, or, Secrets of the Jungle Lords”:  http://www.pjfarmer.com/woldnewton/Articles4.htm#JUNGLE

Christopher Paul Carey Interview

Cover artwork by Bob Eggleton
Cover artwork by Bob Eggleton

Pulp Crazy got a chance to sit down with author Christopher Paul Carey to discuss the upcoming standalone release of The Song of Kwasin, the conclusion to Philip José Farmer’s original Khokarsa/Ancient Opar trilogy.  This is the first time the novel will be available as a standalone edition; it’s the perfect time to pick this up if you’ve been wondering what happens after Hadon of Ancient Opar and Flight to Opar

Chris gives us the lay of the land in terms of the Khokarsa/Ancient Opar series and discusses the history of The Song of Kwasin, providing some insight into the process of working with Philip José Farmer in completing it.  

The Song of Kwasin is the sequel to Philip José Farmer’s Hadon of Ancient Opar (1974) and Flight to Opar (1976), and yet the novel has a different main character. How does The Song of Kwasin continue the storyline of those books?

The first novel of the series stars Hadon of Opar and his wayward adventures after the power-hungry King Minruth cheats him out of winning the throne of Khokarsa by sending him on a fool’s errand into the Wild Lands beyond the empire. Here Hadon runs across his giant, half-mad cousin Kwasin, who has been exiled for his crimes against a priestess of the Great Mother Goddess Kho. After succeeding in his quest, Hadon returns back to the capital with Kwasin and their companions, only to find the empire torn asunder by a civil war. We last see Kwasin in the prow of a boat, swinging his mighty ax of meteoritic iron against Minruth’s overwhelming forces while Hadon and the others escape. In the second novel of the series, a prophecy of the oracle hurls Hadon back to his home city of Opar, but we hear nothing of Kwasin except that he has somehow become king of Dythbeth, a city on the island of Khokarsa that’s at war with Minruth and his armies. The Song of Kwasin picks up right after the events of Hadon of Ancient Opar, and is the story of how Kwasin tries to clear his name and take the fight to Minruth against insurmountable odds. So The Song of Kwasin actually takes place concurrently with many of the events in Flight to Opar.

How did you come to coauthor The Song of Kwasin with Philip José Farmer?

I was serving as coeditor of Farmerphile, a periodical dedicated to publishing Philip José Farmer’s rare and previously unpublished writing, when the original outline and partial manuscript of The Song of Kwasin was found in Phil’s files in 2005. When Farmerphile’s publisher, Michael Croteau, sent me photocopies of the outline and manuscript so we could see whether we wanted to use them in the magazine, I could hardly believe what I was seeing—Kwasin’s epic tale and the entire arc of the war against King Minruth spelled out in full. I knew immediately that the story had to be written, so I wrote up a pitch and sent it to Phil, who at that time had retired from writing. Much to my surprise, he accepted it. I think the fact that we both had a mutual love of anthropology and the works of Edgar Rice Burroughs and H. Rider Haggard—all inspirations for the series—had a lot to do with his decision. I also believe he was excited by the idea of seeing the main arc of the trilogy finally completed. He’d been considering completing the third volume of the series as late as 1999, but he retired shortly after that and then had a number of health setbacks in the years that followed. In 2005, I was in the middle of a graduate study program in writing. Phil and his wife Bette both agreed that I should complete my studies before I began writing the novel, which I did. Though I completed The Song of Kwasin in early 2008, novel wasn’t published until 2012 due to other Farmer projects in the pipes with the publisher. But Phil, who passed in February 2009, was able to see the completed novel, which Bette read aloud to him. And for that I’m glad. I think it meant a lot to Phil to know the novel he’d long planned was at last finished.

What did Philip José Farmer think of the completed novel?

Bette Farmer told me it brought a big smile to Phil’s face to hear Kwasin’s adventures, and that they both really enjoyed it.

Did Mr. Farmer give you any direction while you were working on the novel?

Yes. Early on he told me how he wanted the novel to end. I was able to ask him some questions about alternative courses he’d left open in the outline, and he told me to disregard those and how he wanted the novel to wrap up now that it was to be positioned as the climax of a trilogy. That was all extremely helpful. Later on he was too ill to give me much input, but by then I was already writing the novel and we’d worked out where the story was headed. I’ll always be grateful to Phil for his generosity and encouragement.

The Song of Kwasin was previously available only as part of an omnibus. Could you discuss the bonus materials that will appear in the new standalone edition of The Song of Kwasin, which is due out from Meteor House in December 2015?

First up, there’s a stellar introduction by Paul Di Filippo. That’s a huge honor and treat for me because I admire his writing so much. Then I’ve written a preface to the new edition, giving a lot of background on how the book came to be written. Following the novel comes “Kwasin and the Bear God,” a 20,000-word novella based on Philip José Farmer’s outline that relates a lost adventure set between the first two chapters of The Song of Kwasin. The new edition also includes a “Guide to Khokarsa,” rare articles by Farmer, reproductions of some of his notes on the series, the original and alternate outlines to The Song of Kwasin, and previously unpublished correspondence by Farmer with Frank J. Brueckel and John Harwood, authors of “Heritage of the Flaming God,” the monumental essay that inspired the Khokarsa series.

You mentioned that The Song of Kwasin was the climax of a trilogy. Has the series been completed or is there more coming?

If you read The Song of Kwasin, you’ll understand why I say it’s the end of the main story arc of a trilogy. But there’s still a lot left to tell of the saga of Khokarsa. At one time, Phil said he planned to write twelve books in the series. Using Phil’s notes on where the story was headed, I wrote Hadon, King of Opar, which should be considered the fourth volume in the Khokarsa series. Its sequel, Blood of Ancient Opar, is slated to be published in 2016. After that, I have plans for a trilogy about Hadon’s son, Kohr. I’m also toying with the idea of someday returning to the character Lupoeth, the priestess-heroine of Exiles of Kho, my novella about the origin of the city of Opar. But we’ll see. Right now I’m committed to writing Blood of Ancient Opar and the new trilogy about Kohr. Only Kho and the golden tablets from the lost cities of Opar and Kôr know what happens after that!

The Song of Kwasin releases in December 2015 and can be preordered here.

Christopher Paul Carey
Christopher Paul Carey

Christopher Paul Carey is the coauthor with Philip José Farmer of The Song of Kwasin, and the author of Exiles of Kho and Hadon, King of Opar. His short fiction may be found in anthologies such as Ghost in the Cogs, Tales of the Shadowmen, The Worlds of Philip José Farmer, Tales of the Wold Newton Universe, and The Avenger: The Justice, Inc. Files. He is a senior editor at Paizo on the award-winning Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, and has edited numerous collections, anthologies, and novels. He holds a master’s degree in Writing Popular Fiction from Seton Hill University. Visit him online at http://cpcarey.com.

Pulp Crazy – The Farmerian Tarzan

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/124.mp3

In this week’s episode Chris and Chuck discuss the Farmerian Tarzan, focusing on Philip José Farmer’s official Tarzan projects, Tarzan Alive and The Dark Heart of Time: A Tarzan Novel. Farmer was a lifelong Tarzan fan, and while Tarzan Alive is often spoken of, The Dark Heart of Time seems to be neglected. The Dark Heart of Time also gets a bad rap for having extraterrestrial science fiction elements, but as it turns out, that’s just Farmer going over most of our heads. In this episode Chris explains that Farmer was actually pulling from preexisting African folk lore and mythology, not just throwing in science fiction elements.

I decided to split our conversation right when Chuck began talking about Thomas Yeates’ comic series Tarzan: The Beckoning as Chuck goes into a little bit of Farmer territory here. Chuck then talks briefly about the Hal Foster comic strips, before we move on to discussing Farmer’s Tarzan and how much of a Burroughs fan Farmer was.

Links:

The Official Philip José Farmer Website: http://pjfarmer.com

Meteor House: http://meteorhousepress.com

The International Philip José Farmer Bibliography: http://rnuninga.home.xs4all.nl/

Christopher Paul Carey’s Website: http://cpcarey.com

Hadon of Ancient Opar by Philip Jose Farmer: http://www.amazon.com/Hadon-Ancient-Opar-Khokarsa-Prehistory/dp/1781162956/

Flight to Opar – Restored Edition by Philip Jose Farmer: http://meteorhousepress.com/flight-to-opar/
Hadon, King of Opar by Christopher Paul Carey: http://meteorhousepress.com/hadon-king-of-opar/

Exiles of Kho by Christopher Paul Carey: http://meteorhousepress.com/exiles-of-kho-now-in-hardcover/

Chuck Loridans: http://www.nwlaartgallery.com/Chuck%20Loridans.htm

Chuck’s “Daughters of Greystoke” article: http://www.pjfarmer.com/woldnewton/Articles2.htm#TarzansDaughters

Edgar Rice Burroughs Website: http://www.edgarriceburroughs.com/

Tarzan.com: http://www.tarzan.com/all/

ERBZine: http://erbzine.com/

ERBList: http://erblist.com/

Burroughs Bibliophiles: http://www.burroughsbibliophiles.com/

Pulp Crazy – Edgar Rice Burroughs’ Tarzan

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/123.mp3

This is a special episode of Pulp Crazy for two reasons. The first is that it’s going up on Edgar Rice Burroughs’ birthday, September 1st. The second, is that I’m joined by two special guests Christopher Paul Carey and Chuck Loridans. We’re going to be discussing Edgar Rice Burroughs’ Tarzan. These two are huge Burroughs and Tarzan fans and they cover a lot of ground from the books to other media that they feel captures or in part captures the spirit of the original Burroughs character.

There is also some talk about H. Rider Haggard’s influence on Burroughs, and a bit about how the style and framing sequence of the original Burroughs novels influenced Philip Jose Farmer when he came up with the concept for his biography of Tarzan, Tarzan: Alive. I enjoyed listening to these two go back and forth about Tarzan and ERB this past weekend. We recorded this episode without realizing it was Burroughs’ birthday coming out. So it’s a happy coincidence.

Links:

Edgar Rice Burroughs Website: http://www.edgarriceburroughs.com/

Tarzan.com: http://www.tarzan.com/all/

ERBZine: http://erbzine.com/

ERBList: http://erblist.com/

Burroughs Bibliophiles: http://www.burroughsbibliophiles.com/

Christopher Paul Carey’s Website: http://cpcarey.com

Hadon of Ancient Opar by Philip Jose Farmer: http://www.amazon.com/Hadon-Ancient-Opar-Khokarsa-Prehistory/dp/1781162956/

Flight to Opar – Restored Edition by Philip Jose Farmer: http://meteorhousepress.com/flight-to-opar/
Hadon, King of Opar by Christopher Paul Carey: http://meteorhousepress.com/hadon-king-of-opar/

Exiles of Kho by Christopher Paul Carey: http://meteorhousepress.com/exiles-of-kho-now-in-hardcover/

Chuck Loridans: http://www.nwlaartgallery.com/Chuck%20Loridans.htm

Chuck’s “Daughters of Greystoke” article: http://www.pjfarmer.com/woldnewton/Articles2.htm#TarzansDaughters