Tag Archives: John Carter

Pathfinder: Worldscape #1 Annotations

PathFinder: Worldscape #1 Covers
PathFinder: Worldscape #1 Covers

 

Credits:

Script: Erik Mona

Art: Jonathan Lau

Colors: Omi Remalante

Letters: Simon Bowland

Edited by Joseph Rybandt and Anthony Marques

Pathfinder: Worldscape created by Erik Mona

Special Thanks To:

Jim Sullos and Cathy Wilbanks at Edgar Rice Burroughs Inc.

Luke Liberman and Shannon Kingston at Red Sonja LLC

————————————————————————

 

Page 1

Panel 1:

The Pathfinder Iconics depicted by Wayne Reynolds
The Pathfinder Iconics depicted by Wayne Reynolds

Four of the Pathfinder Universe iconic characters, or Iconics, are battling Thulgroon, from the Pathfinder: City of Secrets comic series.

The scimitar-wielding human cleric is Kyra.

The tattooed white-haired human sorcerer is Seoni.

The leaping dagger-wielding  elven rogue is Merisiel.

The black-haired human fighter with the sword is Valeros.

Page 3

Panel 1:

Sarenrae as depicted by Eva Widermann
Sarenrae as depicted by Eva Widermann

 

Sarenae is a  neutral good deity on the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game’s main world of Golarion; Kyra is one of her clerics.

Page 4

Panel 3:

The pistol-wielding adventurer in a red shirt is Gannus, according to Erik Mona’s Writer’s Commentary on Bleeding Cool, he’s an original character, thought to be from Earth’s Dark Ages.

Jungle Comics #13 featuring Kaanga
Jungle Comics #13 featuring Kaanga

The dirty-blonde-haired guy in the blue vest is De Moire, he’s from Jungle Comics #13 according to Erik Mona, more specifically the Kaanga feature.

Red Sonja: Queen of Plagues
Red Sonja: Queen of Plagues

The red-fishman is Kelgeth, per Erik Mona, he’s a member of a merman race from Gail Simone and Walter Geovani’s Red Sonja arc, Queen of Plagues.

A map of the Hyborian Age
A map of the Hyborian Age

The term Hyborian relates to the Hyborian Age, as created by Robert E. Howard in the original Conan the Cimmerian stories published in Weird Tales during the 1930’s. This is a lost age of Earth’s history set between the time of the sinking of Atlantis and recorded history.

 

Page 5

Panel 1:

An artist's map of Golarion
An artist’s map of Golarion

As mentioned previously, Golarion is the main world of the Pathfinder Role Playing Game.

Panel 2:

Camilla, Queen of the Jungle
Camilla, Queen of the Jungle

“Empress” Camilla is Camilla, Queen of the Jungle, she first appeared in Jungle Comics #1 in June 1940.

Panel 3:

Thun'da by Frank Frazetta and Gardner Fox
Thun’da by Frank Frazetta and Gardner Fox

Shareen is the lost city depicted in the Thun’da comic book by Frank Frazetta and Gardner Fox back in 1952.

Page 7

Panel 2:

Conan as depicted by Cary Nord.
Conan as depicted by Cary Nord.

The Cimmerians are a race of humans from Robert E. Howard’s Hyborian Age. Howard’s most famous creation, Conan the Barbarian is a Cimmerian.  Valerus shares some physical similarities with Conan.

An excellent article on the martial aspects of the Cimmerians: https://www.blackgate.com/2015/10/11/discovering-robert-e-howard-morgan-holmes-on-armies-of-the-hyborian-age-the-cimmerians/

Page 10

Panel 1:

John Carter and Dejah Thoris battle White Apes on Barsoom illustrated by Ken Kelly
John Carter and Dejah Thoris battle White Apes on Barsoom illustrated by Ken Kelly

This creature is a White Ape from Edgar Rice BurroughsJohn Carter of Mars or Barsoom series. They originally appeared in the first book in the series A Princess of Mars.

Page 23

Panel 4:

 

A Thern depicted on the first hardcover edition of The Gods of Mars.
A Thern depicted on the first hardcover edition of The Gods of Mars illustrated by Frank E. Schoonover.

The white-skinned humanoids are White Martians or more specifically, Therns from Edgar Rice BurroughsJohn Carter of Mars or Barsoom series. They originally appeared in Book 2 of the series, The Gods of Mars.

Issus is the self-proclaimed goddess of Barsoom and also appears in The Gods of Mars.

Page 24

Panel 1:

Xanesha as depicted by Andrew Hou
Xanesha as depicted by Andrew Hou

Lady Xanesha is an evil sorcerer who is a native of Golarion. She is of the Lamyros race.

Panel 3:

The Valley of the Death Goddess is possibly a reference to Issus, whom the Therns worship.

Panel 4:

File:Gorilla King.jpg
Gorilla King, Ruthazek by Mauricio Herrera

 

Xanesha mentions an alliance of Empress Camilla’s has barred simians of all kinds from the Shareen Arena.  According to Mona, Issue #2 will introduce us to the other side of the alliance, Gorilla King, Ruthazek from Pathfinder’s own world of Golarion.

Page 25

Panel 5:

Frank Frazetta's depiction of Pha and Thun'da
Frank Frazetta’s depiction of Pha and Thun’da

Pha appeared in the original Thun’da comics by Frank Frazetta and Gardener Fox.

Panel 6:

“I’ve killed three minotaurs, an ogre, a woman made…I think she was part metal.”

I’m not sure who the woman made of metal could be, but it sounds like a reference.

Page 26

Panel 4:

Thun'da by Frank Frazetta and Gardner Fox.
Thun’da by Frank Frazetta and Gardner Fox.

The man who ruled by Pha’s side is none other than Thun’da.

Page 27

Panel 3:

This looks to be a collection of spectators from multiple fictional worlds.  The golden robot looks some-what familiar, but I can’t place him. According to Mona, the shouting guys with helmets are meant to be Red Martians from Barsoom, but there was a coloring mistake.

Panel 4:

Camilla, Queen of the Jungle
Camilla, Queen of the Jungle

The golden-haired woman in a valkyrie-styled helmet is once again, Camilla, Queen of the Jungle.

I’m not sure if her scepter is a reference to anything, or if it’s an original item for this series.

 

Page 28

Panel 1:

Red Sonja as depicted by Frank Thorne
Red Sonja as depicted by Frank Thorne

Enter Red Sonja, the She-Devil with a Sword, based on the heroine first created by Robert E. Howard, Red Sonya of Rogatino in the historical adventure “The Shadow of the Vulture” in the January 1934 issue of Magic Carpet Magazine, adapted into a Hyborian Age comic book character by Roy Thomas and Barry Windsor-Smith in Conan the Barbarian #23 in February 1973.

For more information on the pulp sword-and-sorcery origins of Red Sonja, check out one of my past episodes:

 

 

 

Pulp Adventures Mod by Benton Grey

Pulp Adventures Mod

 

Pulp Adventures Mod by Benton Grey

If you’re interested in video games, I’m willing to bet you’re familiar with mods and the mod community. Mods are fan-made modifications to games already in existence. I was recently made aware of a mod for a World War II Super Hero video game that swaps out the pre-existing super hero characters and their missions with a wide variety of pulp heroes and pulp-styled missions.

 

The video game in question is Freedom Force vs. the 3rd Reich, which was originally created by Irrational Games back in 2005 for the PC. It’s now available to download via the Steam store. This is a real-time tactical role-playing game where you control a group of heroes who time travel back in time to World War II and fight the Nazis.

I’m somewhat familiar with this franchise as the artwork always caught my attention due to its strong Jack Kirby influence, but I can’t say I’ve ever investigated it too deeply. Given the premise, it seems to be an ideal base product to insert some pulpy goodness.

 

With the Pulp Adventures Mod by Benton Grey, rather than the stock heroes, players control the likes of Doc Savage, The Shadow, Indiana Jones, The Green Hornet, Kato, the Rocketeer, The Spider, The Spirit, The Lone Ranger, Tonto, Tarzan, Conan the Barbarian, The Phantom, Captain Midnight, Miss Fury, Dick Tracy, Jungle Jim, Kolu, Monk Mayfair, Ham Brooks, and Renny Renwick on a unique campaign of 17 world-spanning missions. Also, according to the website, “the story features several classic pulp villains and a twisting, turning plot that ties into the settings and adventures of many of the starring characters.”

 

In addition to the huge cast available in the campaign mode mentioned above, Flash Gordon, Buck Rogers, and John Carter of Mars are playable in the sandbox mode at the moment.

 

You can download Freedom Force vs. the 3rd Reich on Steam here: http://store.steampowered.com/app/8890/

You can download the Pulp Adventures Mod and obtain more information here: https://bentongrey.wordpress.com/pulp-adventures-mod/

Here’s a YouTube video that shows Freedom Force vs. the 3rd Reich in action:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q9e0E45ipTs

Looks pretty cool, I don’t have as much time for video games as I used to, but Pulp Adventures looks like something all of us Pulp fans could really get into.

Pulp Crazy – Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/134.mp3

Hello everyone and welcome to this week’s episode of Pulp Crazy. I’m your host, Jason Aiken. In this week’s episode I’m going to be discussing Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens. This film was released nationwide in the United States on December 17, 2015. I will devote this last Pulp Crazy episode of 2015 to reviewing and discussing the film. I figured it would be appropriate for Pulp Crazy because George Lucas didn’t create Star Wars in a vacuum. The pulp science fantasy works of Edgar Rice Burroughs, E. E. ’Doc’ Smith, and Leigh Brackett are without a doubt in the D.N.A. of Star Wars.
SPOILERS AHOY! I can’t critique this movie honestly without mentioning a few things about it. So you’ve been warned, I wouldn’t watch this until after you’ve seen the film, unless you don’t care about spoilers.

Pulp Crazy – Douglas Klauba Interview

Artwork by Douglas Klauba
Artwork by Douglas Klauba

 

Douglas Klauba
Douglas Klauba

Odds are if you’re a pulp fan, you’ve heard the name Douglas Klauba, or at least seen an image he’s illustrated. Douglas was kind enough to answer some questions about what got him interested in the pulps, as well as his latest projects. This includes the 2016 Douglas Klauba Adventure Calendar, currently going into its final few days on Kickstarter.

Pulp Crazy: Thanks so much for agreeing to this interview, Douglas. Your name is a familiar one to pulp fans, and it’s an honor to interview you on Pulp Crazy. As someone who owns a number of the Moonstone anthologies your covers adorn, I love your illustrations of pulp characters. How did you first get interested in the pulps?

Douglas Klauba: Thank you so much! I started getting into pulp art at an early age, early teens while collecting comic books, monster magazines, and paperbacks. And because I was a Steranko fan, I collected his Shadow and other paperbacks that he did covers for, like Weird Heroes. Eventually, Steranko’s Chandler was released and it made a huge impression upon me as a young artist. I was then picking up the comic book versions of The Shadow, The Avenger, Doc Savage, Conan, and John Carter of Mars. It all started to click with me that these new interpretations came from an original source, aside from old time radio… and I ended up becoming a bigger fan of pulp heroes over comic book heroes.

Pulp Crazy: Who are some of your favorite pulp artists? Do any particular pulp covers stand out in your mind?

Douglas Klauba: J. Allen St. John, Rudolph Belarski, Walter Baumhofer, Norm Saunders, Virgil Finlay, Edward Cartier, George Rozen, Rafael DeSoto, and Hubert Rogers. I don’t think I could pick a favorite cover… way too hard: maybe a Rozen cover of The Shadow or a Doc Savage. I do love many Astounding covers by Hubert Rogers.

Pulp Crazy: Has classic pulp art influenced your style? If yes, how so?

Douglas Klauba: Very much so. From figurative, colors, lighting, and composition. I also enjoy working in a black and white pulp influenced style.

Pulp Crazy: What is your favorite genre to draw? Do you find yourself more at home with the hero pulps, science fiction, fantasy, crime, or some other genre within the greater realm of the pulps?

Douglas Klauba: I really do love all that you’ve mentioned. I’ve been fortunate to have been hired by Moonstone for many of their pulp hero books. I like developing paintings with science fiction woman with plenty of retro ray guns and space ships. I’m also a huge fan of the hard boiled private eyes and detectives. I plan on continuing a personal series of paintings in that genre.

Pulp Crazy: What pulp character do you enjoy drawing the most? Is this your favorite pulp character?

Douglas Klauba: While I’m a huge fan of The Shadow, and Doc Savage, as well as The Spider – I really like illustrating crime / detective images. I think I enjoy all the characters equally. I’ve never illustrated The Shadow in color but hope to in the next couple of weeks, after I finish my current painting I’m working on of John Carter, Dejah Thoris, and Tars Tarkas.

Pulp Crazy: Do you have a particular pulp series or character you enjoy reading?

Douglas Klauba: I really enjoy the John Carter books. Some days I like to read The Shadow, while other days I’m in the mood for The Spider.

Pulp Crazy: Outside of pulp characters, what other types of illustrations do you like to create?

Douglas Klauba: Anything to do with movies! I recently completed a commemorative poster for the Clive Barker film, Lord of Illusions. I’m also working on an original pulp inspired adventure graphic
novel, that I hope to finish one day….

Pulp Crazy: You currently have a Kickstarter campaign going to fund a 2016 calendar featuring your artwork, The Douglas Klauba 2016 Adventure Calendar. The Kickstarter campaign has a really nice selection of backing options and reward levels. As of this interview you have 5 days left and are only $500 away from the project being funded. Tell us a little bit about this project. How did it come into being? How difficult was it to pick just 12 images?

Douglas Klauba: I really owe it all to my friend, Bob Garcia. We were discussing projects one day, probably at the Windy City Pulp and Paperback Show, and he really got the ball rolling. I wanted to put some of these pulp themed images in a collection of some sort. Bob ended up presenting a calendar design that blew me away, and then he redesigned it – and it blew me away even more. He also helped me decide on which images.

Bob and I have worked on many book covers and poster projects together. I love his art direction, I trust his judgement, and we work really well together. After his successful, and beautiful The Collectors Book Of Virgil Finlay on Kickstarter, he thought that I could publish this with his guidance. I’ve been pleasantly surprised finding out that there are art fans, and pulp art fans that want to hang my work up every month. So, here we are days away of knowing if the Adventure Calendar will be fully funded or not.

Pulp Crazy: Do you have any other pulp related projects in the works that you can talk about?

Douglas Klauba: Well, as I mentioned, I’m working on a black and white pulp inspired graphic novel. I have a few commissions lined up that need to be taken care of. There are a couple of other projects that are too early to discuss, but I’d be thrilled to announce once they begin.

Pulp Crazy: Thanks again for agreeing to the interview, Douglas. I’m looking forward to getting my hands on the 2016 calendar and future pulp related books featuring your artwork.

Douglas Klauba: Thank you, Jason! I can’t wait to get it into your hands and onto your wall as well!

Back the Douglas Klauba 2016 Adventure Calendar on Kickstarter:
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1800646484/the-douglas-klauba-2016-adventure-calendar

Visit Douglas’ Website: http://www.douglasklauba.com/index.php

Ron Marz Interview – John Carter: Warlord of Mars

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Ron Marz is no stranger to comic book readers. Looking at his comicbookdb profile he’s almost run the alphabetical gamut as a writer. Seriously, he’s just missing series with titles starting with K, L, and Y.

 

While his name is most closely associated with Green Lantern (Kyle Rayner to be precise), he’s also written titles featuring pulp or pulp style characters. These include the Batman/Tarzan: Claws of the Cat-Woman mini for DC, Hellboy: Weird Tales #5 for Dark Horse, Conan: The Isle of No Return mini from Dark Horse, The Phantom Annual for Moonstone, and Red Sonja #30 for Dynamite Comics.

His recent foray into the pulp comics world was the mash-up The Shadow Over Innsmouth from Dynamite Entertainment. A trip to Barsoom is currently in the cards for Ron with John Carter: Warlord of Mars from Dynamite Entertainment.

 

Dynamite Entertainment and ERB Inc have reached a mutually beneficial partnership in publishing stories based on the worlds of Edgar Rice Burroughs. Hence the John Carter name in the title. John Carter: Warlord of Mars #1 hit stores last month in November. Issue #2 is due out this Wednesday November 10th. Ron graciously answered some of Pulp Crazy’s questions about the new series.

 

Pulp Crazy: Ron, first let me say thanks for agreeing to the interview during what is no doubt a very busy time. I’ll just jump right into it things. First, I wanted to ask you about The Shadow Over Innsmouth one-shot from Dynamite Entertainment. You wrote that very much in the spirit of The Shadow pulp magazines, without using any of the supernatural elements developed for the radio show or comic books. Was that a conscious effort?

Ron Marz: I wanted to stick with what was essentially a crime story with supernatural overtones. Obviously if you actually bring Cthulhu into the story, the Shadow isn’t really the dominant force in the plot anymore. But more than that, I really wanted to stick to the elements that are in the original “Innsmouth” story. The Elder Gods don’t really rise from the depths and make a big appearance in that story, it’s much more of a mysterious, moody piece.

PC: Speaking of Pulps, when did you first discover Edgar Rice Burroughs and Barsoom? What is your favorite Edgar Rice Burroughs book? Your favorite Edgar Rice Burroughs character?

RM: I discovered all of the Burroughs stuff at just the right age, maybe 11 or 12, and devoured all of it. I think the stuff that you latch onto at that magic age is the stuff that stays with you for the rest of your life. I don’t know that I have one specific favorite book, but the Mars books are my favorite series. And if I had to pick one character as a favorite, I suppose it would be Tarzan, just because he appears in so many more adventures than John Carter.

PC: John Carter: Warlord of Mars, how are you approaching this new series continuity wise? Is it set within a certain period of the Edgar Rice Burroughs original stories, or is this in a new continuity? Can you tease at the plot for the first arc?

RM: I’m not getting overly precious with the continuity in terms of exactly when these stories take place, other than the “classic” period with John and Dejah front and center. Continuity should be a tool a writer uses, not the other way around. I wanted to do a big story for the first arc, so we’re jumping in with a six-issue storyline initially. One of my main goals, in addition to firmly establishing the characters and setting, is to introduce a villain who’s actually worthy of John Carter’s prowess. So in the first issue, we meet Captain Joshua Clark, a Union officer, who is in many ways John Carter’s complete opposite number.

 

PC: Who really is John Carter? One big mystery has always been John Carter’s past. In the original stories he never recalled his childhood. As long as he can remember he has been a fighting man in his physical prime. Do you plan to address this in the new series?

RM: You know, I’ve toyed with the idea of exploring that a bit, but so far I keep coming back to the notion that sometimes it’s good to let a mystery remain a mystery. I think I liked Wolverine better when we didn’t know his past, when his “origin” hadn’t been revealed. Not all stories have to be told.

PC: The covers feature John Carter and Dejah Thoris quite prominently, as well as Tars Tarkas and Woola. Can you give us an idea of who the main cast will be?

RM: You just named them. As far as I’m concerned, those are the characters that the audience wants to read about, and they’re certainly the characters that I want to write about. It’s the same as when I wrote “Star Wars” comics for Dark Horse. I wanted to write stories about Luke and Han and Leia and Darth Vader, not the third Storm Trooper on the left.

PC: Starting with the fourth book in the series, John Carter takes a backseat to new Barsoomian heroes. Will Carthoris, Thuvia and Kantos Kan play any roles? I have to admit my favorite character is Gahan of Gahol, from The Chessmen of Mars, any plans for him to show up?

RM: I’d like to eventually work in all those characters, but my plans for the foreseeable future are to concentrate on John, Dejah and Tars. Honestly, I’ve wanted to write these characters since I was 11 years old, so I’m going to make them my focus.

PC: I hear you are putting the War into Warlord when it comes to this new series. Can you describe the tone of the book? Will this be written as story arcs or serialized single issue stories?

RM: The original novels are full of action — chase scenes, escapes, sword fights. The comics are going to be action-oriented as well. I don’t think anyone is showing up to see John and Dejah have tea. I’m approaching this in much the same manner that I approach anything that I write. It’s all meant to be character-driven, and visually appealing. These are comics. If we’re not giving you something interesting and exciting to look at, you might as well go read a book without any pictures. My plan is to alternate between longer arcs and shorter ones, with some single-issue stories thrown in as well.

PC: What is it like not only Dynamite Entertainment, but also Edgar Rice Buroughs Inc? Can you give us an idea of how the creative process goes? Do both entities have to sign off on plots and story ideas, as well as the finished product?

RM: Both Dynamite and Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc., have given me a pretty free hand with these stories. I have a relationship with ERB, Inc. already, since I’m writing a couple of weekly strips for their website. I’m writing “Korak,” with art by Rick Leonardi, and “The Mucker,” with art by Lee Moder, and coloring on both by Neeraj Menon. The work of Burroughs played a huge part in me wanting to become a writer. So I feel like I’m repaying some of that debt by working on these projects. Being trusted to follow the footsteps of Edgar Rice Burroughs is absolutely an honor.

PC: You are working with Abhishek Malsuni on John Carter: Warlord of Mars, how is Barsoom looking through his lens? What was your first reaction to his interior artwork on the book?

RM: I’m thrilled with what Abhishek and the rest of the art team are doing. I had worked with Abhishek on some projects for the Indian comics market, and even then I felt like his style would be a great fit for John Carter stories. I feel very fortunate that the whole thing has fallen into place. You’ll have to take my word for it, since only the first issue is out so far, but each issue looks better than the previous one.

PC: Anything you want to say to fans of classic Edgar Rice Burroughs characters? Do you think this will be up their alley?

RM: I would hope that fans of Edgar Rice Burroughs are already reading the book, and I hope they’re pleased with what we’re doing. I also hope we’re able to lure in readers who haven’t been exposed to this material before. That’s going to be the real test of what we’re doing, reeling in people who haven’t visited Barsoom previously. I want everybody, old fans and new ones alike.

 

Thanks Ron, and congrats on living out one of your childhood dreams! See you on Barsoom!bombshellcover

Pulp Crazy – John Carter: Warlord of Mars #1 Review

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/088.mp3

In this weeks episode I will be reviewing John Carter: Warlord of Mars #1 from Dynamite Entertainment. The comic is written by Ron Marz and illustrated by Abishek Malsuni. Nanjan Jamberi lends some amazing colors and Rob Steen is on lettering.

The comic just came out this week, so I wanted to put up a review, as this is a pretty big occasion. This is the first authorized John Carter comic we’ve seen since Marvel put them out a few years back to coincide with the Disney Movie. Dynamite has been publishing comics set around the public domain John Carter stories, but a settlement has been reached between Dynamite and Edgar Rice Burroughs Inc. that allows for new, authorized tales to be told. John Carter: Warlord of Mars #1 marks the beginning of this partnership.

 

Links:

Buy the comic on Comixology: https://www.comixology.com/John-Carter-Warlord-of-Mars-1-Digital-Exclusive-Edition/digital-comic/160794

Comic Shop Locator: http://www.comicshoplocator.com/storelocator

Edgar Rice Burroughs Website: http://www.edgarriceburroughs.com/

Dynamite Entertainment: http://www.dynamite.com/htmlfiles/

Edgar Rice Burroughs Online Comic Strips: http://www.edgarriceburroughs.com/comics/

Barsoom @wikipedia:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barsoom

Edgar Rice Burroughs’ Birthday – Free eBooks and Audio Books

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Today is the birthday of Edgar Rice Burroughs. His work and imagination have inspired generations upon generations of fictioneers. The influence of Tarzan and the Barsoom (John Carter of Mars) series alone are immeasurable. Here are some links to free eBooks and audio book of ERB’s work, as well as websites who are keeping the memory of ERB alive.

Links:

Free eBook at Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/search/?query=Edgar+Rice+Burroughs

Free audio books at Librivox.org: https://librivox.org/author/698?primary_key=698&search_category=author&search_page=1&search_form=get_results

EdgarRiceBurroughs.com: http://www.edgarriceburroughs.com/

ERBzine: http://erbzine.com/

Burroughs Bibliophiles:  https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Burroughs-Bibliophiles/107108829310397

Pulp Crazy – The Barsoom Cycle By Edgar Rice Burroughs

The Barsoom Cycle by Edgar Rice Burroughs is discussed. This is also known as the John Carter of Mars series or the Barsoom series.

Links:

The Barsoom Cycle Public Domain Downloads:

Librivox Audio Books: http://tinyurl.com/lxhuqxz
Project Gutenberg Ebooks: http://tinyurl.com/ktn9xgf

Barsoom Information:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barsoom
http://barsoom.wikia.com/wiki/Main_Page
Edgar Rice Burroughs

http://www.edgarriceburroughs.com/
http://www.erbzine.com/
http://www.burroughsbibliophiles.com/

Percival Lowell:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Percival_Lowell
http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/349831/Percival-Lowell

Jetan – Martian Chess:

http://www.erbzine.com/mag11/1147.html
http://www.erbzine.com/mag11/1148.html
http://www.erbzine.com/mag11/1149.html