Tag Archives: pulp comics

Pathfinder: Worldscape #1 Annotations

PathFinder: Worldscape #1 Covers
PathFinder: Worldscape #1 Covers

 

Credits:

Script: Erik Mona

Art: Jonathan Lau

Colors: Omi Remalante

Letters: Simon Bowland

Edited by Joseph Rybandt and Anthony Marques

Pathfinder: Worldscape created by Erik Mona

Special Thanks To:

Jim Sullos and Cathy Wilbanks at Edgar Rice Burroughs Inc.

Luke Liberman and Shannon Kingston at Red Sonja LLC

————————————————————————

 

Page 1

Panel 1:

The Pathfinder Iconics depicted by Wayne Reynolds
The Pathfinder Iconics depicted by Wayne Reynolds

Four of the Pathfinder Universe iconic characters, or Iconics, are battling Thulgroon, from the Pathfinder: City of Secrets comic series.

The scimitar-wielding human cleric is Kyra.

The tattooed white-haired human sorcerer is Seoni.

The leaping dagger-wielding  elven rogue is Merisiel.

The black-haired human fighter with the sword is Valeros.

Page 3

Panel 1:

Sarenrae as depicted by Eva Widermann
Sarenrae as depicted by Eva Widermann

 

Sarenae is a  neutral good deity on the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game’s main world of Golarion; Kyra is one of her clerics.

Page 4

Panel 3:

The pistol-wielding adventurer in a red shirt is Gannus, according to Erik Mona’s Writer’s Commentary on Bleeding Cool, he’s an original character, thought to be from Earth’s Dark Ages.

Jungle Comics #13 featuring Kaanga
Jungle Comics #13 featuring Kaanga

The dirty-blonde-haired guy in the blue vest is De Moire, he’s from Jungle Comics #13 according to Erik Mona, more specifically the Kaanga feature.

Red Sonja: Queen of Plagues
Red Sonja: Queen of Plagues

The red-fishman is Kelgeth, per Erik Mona, he’s a member of a merman race from Gail Simone and Walter Geovani’s Red Sonja arc, Queen of Plagues.

A map of the Hyborian Age
A map of the Hyborian Age

The term Hyborian relates to the Hyborian Age, as created by Robert E. Howard in the original Conan the Cimmerian stories published in Weird Tales during the 1930’s. This is a lost age of Earth’s history set between the time of the sinking of Atlantis and recorded history.

 

Page 5

Panel 1:

An artist's map of Golarion
An artist’s map of Golarion

As mentioned previously, Golarion is the main world of the Pathfinder Role Playing Game.

Panel 2:

Camilla, Queen of the Jungle
Camilla, Queen of the Jungle

“Empress” Camilla is Camilla, Queen of the Jungle, she first appeared in Jungle Comics #1 in June 1940.

Panel 3:

Thun'da by Frank Frazetta and Gardner Fox
Thun’da by Frank Frazetta and Gardner Fox

Shareen is the lost city depicted in the Thun’da comic book by Frank Frazetta and Gardner Fox back in 1952.

Page 7

Panel 2:

Conan as depicted by Cary Nord.
Conan as depicted by Cary Nord.

The Cimmerians are a race of humans from Robert E. Howard’s Hyborian Age. Howard’s most famous creation, Conan the Barbarian is a Cimmerian.  Valerus shares some physical similarities with Conan.

An excellent article on the martial aspects of the Cimmerians: https://www.blackgate.com/2015/10/11/discovering-robert-e-howard-morgan-holmes-on-armies-of-the-hyborian-age-the-cimmerians/

Page 10

Panel 1:

John Carter and Dejah Thoris battle White Apes on Barsoom illustrated by Ken Kelly
John Carter and Dejah Thoris battle White Apes on Barsoom illustrated by Ken Kelly

This creature is a White Ape from Edgar Rice BurroughsJohn Carter of Mars or Barsoom series. They originally appeared in the first book in the series A Princess of Mars.

Page 23

Panel 4:

 

A Thern depicted on the first hardcover edition of The Gods of Mars.
A Thern depicted on the first hardcover edition of The Gods of Mars illustrated by Frank E. Schoonover.

The white-skinned humanoids are White Martians or more specifically, Therns from Edgar Rice BurroughsJohn Carter of Mars or Barsoom series. They originally appeared in Book 2 of the series, The Gods of Mars.

Issus is the self-proclaimed goddess of Barsoom and also appears in The Gods of Mars.

Page 24

Panel 1:

Xanesha as depicted by Andrew Hou
Xanesha as depicted by Andrew Hou

Lady Xanesha is an evil sorcerer who is a native of Golarion. She is of the Lamyros race.

Panel 3:

The Valley of the Death Goddess is possibly a reference to Issus, whom the Therns worship.

Panel 4:

File:Gorilla King.jpg
Gorilla King, Ruthazek by Mauricio Herrera

 

Xanesha mentions an alliance of Empress Camilla’s has barred simians of all kinds from the Shareen Arena.  According to Mona, Issue #2 will introduce us to the other side of the alliance, Gorilla King, Ruthazek from Pathfinder’s own world of Golarion.

Page 25

Panel 5:

Frank Frazetta's depiction of Pha and Thun'da
Frank Frazetta’s depiction of Pha and Thun’da

Pha appeared in the original Thun’da comics by Frank Frazetta and Gardener Fox.

Panel 6:

“I’ve killed three minotaurs, an ogre, a woman made…I think she was part metal.”

I’m not sure who the woman made of metal could be, but it sounds like a reference.

Page 26

Panel 4:

Thun'da by Frank Frazetta and Gardner Fox.
Thun’da by Frank Frazetta and Gardner Fox.

The man who ruled by Pha’s side is none other than Thun’da.

Page 27

Panel 3:

This looks to be a collection of spectators from multiple fictional worlds.  The golden robot looks some-what familiar, but I can’t place him. According to Mona, the shouting guys with helmets are meant to be Red Martians from Barsoom, but there was a coloring mistake.

Panel 4:

Camilla, Queen of the Jungle
Camilla, Queen of the Jungle

The golden-haired woman in a valkyrie-styled helmet is once again, Camilla, Queen of the Jungle.

I’m not sure if her scepter is a reference to anything, or if it’s an original item for this series.

 

Page 28

Panel 1:

Red Sonja as depicted by Frank Thorne
Red Sonja as depicted by Frank Thorne

Enter Red Sonja, the She-Devil with a Sword, based on the heroine first created by Robert E. Howard, Red Sonya of Rogatino in the historical adventure “The Shadow of the Vulture” in the January 1934 issue of Magic Carpet Magazine, adapted into a Hyborian Age comic book character by Roy Thomas and Barry Windsor-Smith in Conan the Barbarian #23 in February 1973.

For more information on the pulp sword-and-sorcery origins of Red Sonja, check out one of my past episodes:

 

 

 

Pulp Crazy – Weird Detective: The Stars Are Wrong

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/141.mp3

 

In this week’s episode I’m going to be discussing a comic book that ties in with H. P. Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos. Weird Detective from Dark Horse comics.

I think it’s a comic that kind of fell below everyone’s radar last year and I’m going to be discussing it in depth during this episode. There will be spoilers, but this is more of a setup than a self-contained story, so don’t be afraid to keep listening. This is more like a #0 or #1 issue.

Weird Detective ran in Dark Horse Presents, Dark Horse’s staple comics anthology title. Weird Detective is branded as a Lovecraftian crime comic. The tag-line is, “It takes a monster to catch a monster.” It’s written by Fred Van Lente and illustrated by Guiu Vilanova. Josan Gonzalez is the colorist and Nate Piekos of BLAMBOT is the letterer. Francesco Francavilla provided art for one of the covers to Dark Horse Presents #8 featuring Sebastian Greene, the main character.

The third part concludes by announcing Weird Detective will return in a new #1 issue.

Links:

Dark Horse Website: http://darkhorse.com

The Lovecraft e-Zine: http://lovecraftzine.com

Tarzan and the Gods of Opar Part Three by Mike Grell

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/114.mp3

In this weeks episode I will be discussing Tarzan and the Gods of Opar Part Three written and illustrated by Mike Grell. This is the third and final installment of Tarzan and the Gods of Opar and it appeared a few weeks back in Dark Horse Presents #10. Once again Grell delivers eight wonderful pages of Tarzan. I really wish Dark Horse would make Tarzan a fixture in the pages of Dark Horse Presents, and have Grell illustrate eight pages a month. This was a great story, and Dark Horse really needs to make better use of the Tarzan property in my opinion.

Links:

Preview: http://www.darkhorse.com/Comics/Previews/24-125?page=0

Buy the Digital Issue: https://digital.darkhorse.com/profile/5727.dark-horse-presents-10/

Comic Shop Locator:  http://www.comicshoplocator.com/storelocator

Mike Grell at ComicBookDB: http://comicbookdb.com/creator.php?ID=1026

More Opar goodness:

Pre-order Hadon, King of Opar: Book 4 of the Khokarsa Series by Christopher Paul Careyhttp://meteorhousepress.com/hadon-king-of-opar/

Pre-order Flight to Opar – Restored Edition Book 2 of the Khokarsa Series by Philip José Farmerhttp://meteorhousepress.com/flight-to-opar/

Pre-order Exiles of Kho: Prequel to the Khokarsa Series by Christopher Paul Careyhttp://meteorhousepress.com/exiles-of-kho-now-in-hardcover/

Christopher Paul Carey’s Website: http://www.cpcarey.com/

Purchase Hadon of Ancient Opar: Book 1 in the Khokarsa Series by Philip José Farmer: http://www.amazon.com/Hadon-Ancient-Opar-Khokarsa-Prehistory/dp/1781162956/

Purchase Kwasin & The Bear God by Philip José Farmer and Christopher Paul Carey: http://meteorhousepress.com/the-worlds-of-philip-jose-farmer-2-of-dust-and-soul/ |  http://www.amazon.com/Tales-Newton-Universe-Philip-Farmer/dp/1781163049/

Purchase Iron & Bronze by Win Scott Eckert and Christopher Paul Carey: http://www.amazon.com/Iron-Bronze-Win-Scott-Eckert-ebook/dp/B00580VNIU/

Explore the World of Lost Khokarsa Website: http://www.pjfarmer.com/khokarsa/khokarsa.htm

Bob Eggleton’s Website: http://www.bobeggleton.com/

Meteor House: http://meteorhousepress.com/

The Official Philip José Farmer Website: http://pjfarmer.com/

Philip José Farmer International Bibliography: http://www.philipjosefarmer.tk/

Pulp Crazy – Tarzan and the Gods of Opar Part Two by Mike Grell

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/110.mp3

In this weeks episode I’m going to be discussing Tarzan and the Gods of Opar Part Two written and illustrated by Mike Grell. It was published a few weeks back in Dark Horse Presents #9.

Part Two  picks up right where Part One left off, with Tarzan rescuing a brunette woman of Opar from a leopard. It turns out this woman isn’t La, but a young priestess named Oona.

She fills Tarzan in on what’s been happening in Opar since the arrival of Sir Richard Kincaid and Wilson via their hot air balloon. The story progresses from there.

Links:

Preview: https://www.darkhorse.com/Comics/Previews/24-124?page=0

Buy The Digital Issue: https://digital.darkhorse.com/profile/5568.dark-horse-presents-9-1/

Comic Shop Locator:  http://www.comicshoplocator.com/storelocator

Mike Grell at ComicBookDB: http://comicbookdb.com/creator.php?ID=1026

Pulp Crazy – Savage Sword of Criminal

 

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/108.mp3

In this weeks episode I’m going to be discussing a comic book that came out last month. It’s one of the coolest comics I’ve ever read. Criminal: The Special Edition, The Savage Sword of Criminal. This is a magazine sized comic that was written by Ed Brubaker and illustrated by Sean Phillips, the co-creators of Criminal. It was colored by Elizabeth Breitweiser.

I’m going to be discussing the magazine sized variant for the most part, but there was a regular sized edition put out without all of the design elements. Later in this episode I’m going to include a video and do a side by side comparison of the two. I’ll also put Savage Sword of Criminal next to some Savage Sword of Conan magazines for comparison as well.

I’m going to try and explain this one-shot as best as I can, and hope everyone stays with me, but I think the video will ultimately do a better job visually than I can do via audio.

Links:

 

Ed Brubaker on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Ed-Brubaker/e/B001K8L8ZW

Ed Brubaker Twitter: https://twitter.com/brubaker

Sean Phillips on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/s?ie=UTF8&page=1&rh=n%3A283155%2Cp_27%3ASean%20Phillips

Sean Phillips Website: http://www.seanphillips.co.uk/

Sean Phillips Twitter: https://twitter.com/seanpphillips

The Art of Sean Phillips Blogspot: http://theartofseanphillips.blogspot.com/

Image Comics: http://imagecomics.com

Robert E. Howard Forums: http://conan.com

Robert E. Howard Foundation: http://www.rehfoundation.org/

 

Pulp Crazy – Tarzan and The Gods of Opar Part One by Mike Grell

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/105.mp3

In this bonus episode I’m going to be discussing Tarzan and the Gods of Opar, Part One. Tarzan and the Gods of Opar is being serialized over the next 3 months in Dark Horse Presents, beginning this week with Dark Horse Presents #8. The comic has two covers, one with Fred Van Lente’s Weird Detective and the other with a Tarzan cover by Mike Grell.

 

Correction: Mike Grell didn’t write and illustrate Tarzan: The Savage Heart, he illustrated it. Alan Gross wrote it.

Links:

Preview:  https://www.darkhorse.com/Comics/24-123/Dark-Horse-Presents-8

Buy The Digital Issue:  https://digital.darkhorse.com/profile/5493.dark-horse-presents-8/

Comic Shop Locator:  http://www.comicshoplocator.com/storelocator

Mike Grell at ComicBookDB: http://comicbookdb.com/creator.php?ID=1026

Pulp Crazy – Five Ghosts Volume 1

 

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/096.mp3

In this weeks episode I will be discussing a pulp themed comic book collection, Five Ghosts Volume 1: The Haunting of Fabian Gray. It is written by Frank J. Barbiere and the art is by Chris Mooneyham. S.M. Vidaurri and Lauren Affe are the colorists. The logo and graphic design are by Dylan Todd. It is published by Image Comics.

Five Ghosts Volume 1: The Haunting of Fabian Gray was published in 2014 and it collects Five Ghosts #1-5. The regular price for this collections is only $9.99, which is cheaper than buying these in individual issues. The price comes out to only $2.00 an issue before tax, which is a nice bargain, and a great way of introducing readers to a new series.

The premise of Five Ghosts is a cool take on a classic concept going back to characters such as Mimic from Marvel Comics (who could take the powers of five different characters at a time) and Amazo from DC Comics (who had all the powers of the Justice League) and the 1970’s Captain Action toys (where Captain Action could transform into various comic book and TV heroes).

The lead character in Five Ghosts, Fabian Gray has similar abilities. His abilities are more similar to Mimic and Amazo as his physical appearance doesn’t change all that much during the process, but he can summon the abilities of five different literary ghosts. The Five Ghosts are: The Archer, The Wizard, The Detective, The Samurai, and the Vampire. Although these literary ghosts aren’t named, it appears they are meant to be: Robin Hood, Merlin, Sherlock Holmes, Miyamato Musashi, and Dracula. He is able to do this via a chunk of Dreamstone that is lodged in his chest.

Links:

Comic Shop Locator: http://www.comicshoplocator.com/storelocator

Purchase Five Ghosts Volume 1 on Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/pa2mjtr

Purchase Five Ghosts Volume 2 on Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/mq93f5m

Purchase Five Ghosts on Comixology: https://www.comixology.com/Five-Ghosts/comics-series/9855?ref=Y29taWMvdmlldy9kZXNrdG9wL2JyZWFkY3J1bWJz

Five Ghosts at Image.com: https://imagecomics.com/comics/series/five-ghosts

Black Mask Studios: http://blackmaskstudios.com/

Ron Marz Interview – John Carter: Warlord of Mars

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Ron Marz is no stranger to comic book readers. Looking at his comicbookdb profile he’s almost run the alphabetical gamut as a writer. Seriously, he’s just missing series with titles starting with K, L, and Y.

 

While his name is most closely associated with Green Lantern (Kyle Rayner to be precise), he’s also written titles featuring pulp or pulp style characters. These include the Batman/Tarzan: Claws of the Cat-Woman mini for DC, Hellboy: Weird Tales #5 for Dark Horse, Conan: The Isle of No Return mini from Dark Horse, The Phantom Annual for Moonstone, and Red Sonja #30 for Dynamite Comics.

His recent foray into the pulp comics world was the mash-up The Shadow Over Innsmouth from Dynamite Entertainment. A trip to Barsoom is currently in the cards for Ron with John Carter: Warlord of Mars from Dynamite Entertainment.

 

Dynamite Entertainment and ERB Inc have reached a mutually beneficial partnership in publishing stories based on the worlds of Edgar Rice Burroughs. Hence the John Carter name in the title. John Carter: Warlord of Mars #1 hit stores last month in November. Issue #2 is due out this Wednesday November 10th. Ron graciously answered some of Pulp Crazy’s questions about the new series.

 

Pulp Crazy: Ron, first let me say thanks for agreeing to the interview during what is no doubt a very busy time. I’ll just jump right into it things. First, I wanted to ask you about The Shadow Over Innsmouth one-shot from Dynamite Entertainment. You wrote that very much in the spirit of The Shadow pulp magazines, without using any of the supernatural elements developed for the radio show or comic books. Was that a conscious effort?

Ron Marz: I wanted to stick with what was essentially a crime story with supernatural overtones. Obviously if you actually bring Cthulhu into the story, the Shadow isn’t really the dominant force in the plot anymore. But more than that, I really wanted to stick to the elements that are in the original “Innsmouth” story. The Elder Gods don’t really rise from the depths and make a big appearance in that story, it’s much more of a mysterious, moody piece.

PC: Speaking of Pulps, when did you first discover Edgar Rice Burroughs and Barsoom? What is your favorite Edgar Rice Burroughs book? Your favorite Edgar Rice Burroughs character?

RM: I discovered all of the Burroughs stuff at just the right age, maybe 11 or 12, and devoured all of it. I think the stuff that you latch onto at that magic age is the stuff that stays with you for the rest of your life. I don’t know that I have one specific favorite book, but the Mars books are my favorite series. And if I had to pick one character as a favorite, I suppose it would be Tarzan, just because he appears in so many more adventures than John Carter.

PC: John Carter: Warlord of Mars, how are you approaching this new series continuity wise? Is it set within a certain period of the Edgar Rice Burroughs original stories, or is this in a new continuity? Can you tease at the plot for the first arc?

RM: I’m not getting overly precious with the continuity in terms of exactly when these stories take place, other than the “classic” period with John and Dejah front and center. Continuity should be a tool a writer uses, not the other way around. I wanted to do a big story for the first arc, so we’re jumping in with a six-issue storyline initially. One of my main goals, in addition to firmly establishing the characters and setting, is to introduce a villain who’s actually worthy of John Carter’s prowess. So in the first issue, we meet Captain Joshua Clark, a Union officer, who is in many ways John Carter’s complete opposite number.

 

PC: Who really is John Carter? One big mystery has always been John Carter’s past. In the original stories he never recalled his childhood. As long as he can remember he has been a fighting man in his physical prime. Do you plan to address this in the new series?

RM: You know, I’ve toyed with the idea of exploring that a bit, but so far I keep coming back to the notion that sometimes it’s good to let a mystery remain a mystery. I think I liked Wolverine better when we didn’t know his past, when his “origin” hadn’t been revealed. Not all stories have to be told.

PC: The covers feature John Carter and Dejah Thoris quite prominently, as well as Tars Tarkas and Woola. Can you give us an idea of who the main cast will be?

RM: You just named them. As far as I’m concerned, those are the characters that the audience wants to read about, and they’re certainly the characters that I want to write about. It’s the same as when I wrote “Star Wars” comics for Dark Horse. I wanted to write stories about Luke and Han and Leia and Darth Vader, not the third Storm Trooper on the left.

PC: Starting with the fourth book in the series, John Carter takes a backseat to new Barsoomian heroes. Will Carthoris, Thuvia and Kantos Kan play any roles? I have to admit my favorite character is Gahan of Gahol, from The Chessmen of Mars, any plans for him to show up?

RM: I’d like to eventually work in all those characters, but my plans for the foreseeable future are to concentrate on John, Dejah and Tars. Honestly, I’ve wanted to write these characters since I was 11 years old, so I’m going to make them my focus.

PC: I hear you are putting the War into Warlord when it comes to this new series. Can you describe the tone of the book? Will this be written as story arcs or serialized single issue stories?

RM: The original novels are full of action — chase scenes, escapes, sword fights. The comics are going to be action-oriented as well. I don’t think anyone is showing up to see John and Dejah have tea. I’m approaching this in much the same manner that I approach anything that I write. It’s all meant to be character-driven, and visually appealing. These are comics. If we’re not giving you something interesting and exciting to look at, you might as well go read a book without any pictures. My plan is to alternate between longer arcs and shorter ones, with some single-issue stories thrown in as well.

PC: What is it like not only Dynamite Entertainment, but also Edgar Rice Buroughs Inc? Can you give us an idea of how the creative process goes? Do both entities have to sign off on plots and story ideas, as well as the finished product?

RM: Both Dynamite and Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc., have given me a pretty free hand with these stories. I have a relationship with ERB, Inc. already, since I’m writing a couple of weekly strips for their website. I’m writing “Korak,” with art by Rick Leonardi, and “The Mucker,” with art by Lee Moder, and coloring on both by Neeraj Menon. The work of Burroughs played a huge part in me wanting to become a writer. So I feel like I’m repaying some of that debt by working on these projects. Being trusted to follow the footsteps of Edgar Rice Burroughs is absolutely an honor.

PC: You are working with Abhishek Malsuni on John Carter: Warlord of Mars, how is Barsoom looking through his lens? What was your first reaction to his interior artwork on the book?

RM: I’m thrilled with what Abhishek and the rest of the art team are doing. I had worked with Abhishek on some projects for the Indian comics market, and even then I felt like his style would be a great fit for John Carter stories. I feel very fortunate that the whole thing has fallen into place. You’ll have to take my word for it, since only the first issue is out so far, but each issue looks better than the previous one.

PC: Anything you want to say to fans of classic Edgar Rice Burroughs characters? Do you think this will be up their alley?

RM: I would hope that fans of Edgar Rice Burroughs are already reading the book, and I hope they’re pleased with what we’re doing. I also hope we’re able to lure in readers who haven’t been exposed to this material before. That’s going to be the real test of what we’re doing, reeling in people who haven’t visited Barsoom previously. I want everybody, old fans and new ones alike.

 

Thanks Ron, and congrats on living out one of your childhood dreams! See you on Barsoom!bombshellcover

The Sword Women of Robert E. Howard & C.L. Moore: The Lineage of Red Sonja

 

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/091.mp3

In this weeks episode I will be covering the Sword Women of Robert E. Howard & C.L. Moore, and their connection to the comic book character of Red Sonja. I think this is one of the best examples of how classic pulp characters are still influencing fiction today.

I’ve wanted to do this episode for a few years now, it was just a matter of reading all of the pulp tales with these ladies in them. I will discuss each of the 4 red haired Sword Women, in the order of their creation.

Sources/Links:

Sword Women Timeline: http://PULPCRAZY.COM/?page_id=692

Purchase Sword Women & Other Historical Adventures by Robert E. Howard: http://tinyurl.com/mbmrzoa

Purchase Black God’s Kiss from C.L. Moore: http://tinyurl.com/obret9k

Read The Shadow of the Vulture by Robert E. Howard: http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks06/0608101.txt

Read Hellsgarde by C.L. Moore: http://www.pulpmags.org/PDFs/WT_1939_04.pdf

Dark Agnes: http://www.blackgate.com/2009/12/29/howard%E2%80%99s-forgotten-redhead-dark-agnes/

Jirel of Joiry: http://www.blackgate.com/jirel-of-joiry-the-mother-of-us-all/

Red Sonja/Sonya Agreement:
http://www.rehtwogunraconteur.com/?p=1942
http://www.conan.com/f_redsonya.shtml

 

Red Sonja Prose Novels at BlackGate: http://www.blackgate.com/2013/04/09/red-sonja-the-novels/

Wikis

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Sonja

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark_Agnes_de_Chastillon

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jirel_of_Joiry

Companies:

Dark Horse: http://www.darkhorse.com/

Dynamite: http://www.dynamite.com/htmlfiles/

Conan: http://www.conan.com/invboard/

Pulp Crazy – John Carter: Warlord of Mars #1 Review

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/088.mp3

In this weeks episode I will be reviewing John Carter: Warlord of Mars #1 from Dynamite Entertainment. The comic is written by Ron Marz and illustrated by Abishek Malsuni. Nanjan Jamberi lends some amazing colors and Rob Steen is on lettering.

The comic just came out this week, so I wanted to put up a review, as this is a pretty big occasion. This is the first authorized John Carter comic we’ve seen since Marvel put them out a few years back to coincide with the Disney Movie. Dynamite has been publishing comics set around the public domain John Carter stories, but a settlement has been reached between Dynamite and Edgar Rice Burroughs Inc. that allows for new, authorized tales to be told. John Carter: Warlord of Mars #1 marks the beginning of this partnership.

 

Links:

Buy the comic on Comixology: https://www.comixology.com/John-Carter-Warlord-of-Mars-1-Digital-Exclusive-Edition/digital-comic/160794

Comic Shop Locator: http://www.comicshoplocator.com/storelocator

Edgar Rice Burroughs Website: http://www.edgarriceburroughs.com/

Dynamite Entertainment: http://www.dynamite.com/htmlfiles/

Edgar Rice Burroughs Online Comic Strips: http://www.edgarriceburroughs.com/comics/

Barsoom @wikipedia:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barsoom