http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/095.mp3

In this weeks episode I will be discussing Batman: Noel by Lee Bermejo. While Batman is not a pulp character, he is the modern day descendant of the classic pulp heroes.

This original graphic novel was published by DC Comics in 2011. Bermejo serves as both the illustrator and writer, with Barbara Ciardo on colors and Todd Klein on letters.

This story is inspired by A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, with Batman and his supporting cast taking up roles akin to the Christmas Classic. Batman takes up the role of Scrooge.

Links:

Batman: Noel on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Batman-Noel-Lee-Bermejo/dp/1401232132

Batman: Noel on Comixology: https://www.comixology.com/Batman-Noel/digital-comic/49442

Wold Newton Day 12/13/2014 – The Shadow Midnight in Moscow by Howard Chaykin

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/094.mp3

This is a special bonus episode in celebration of Wold Newton Day, December 13th. In celebration of Wold Newton Day 2014, I’ll be discussing The Shadow: Midnight in Moscow written and illustrated by Howard Chaykin from Dynamite Entertainment. This comic book mini series is notable as being the first overt reference to Philip Jose Farmer’s Wold Newton Family concept in comic book format. The series also marks Howard Chaykin’s return to the Shadow since his landmark 1986 mini series at DC which revitalized the character.

Midnight in Moscow begins on January 31, 1949 and the rest of the story takes place in the early days of 1950, where as Chaykin’s 1986 mini series took place in contemporary times. Midnight in Moscow can be placed in the Wold Newton Universe. Midnight in Moscow is a prelude to the 1986 series, so by extension the 1986 series can also be thought of as being in the Wold Newton Universe as well if one wishes.

Links:

Introduction to the Wold Newton Universe: http://www.sfsignal.com/archives/2013/10/excerpt-read-the-introduction-from-tales-of-the-wold-newton-universe-edited-by-win-scott-eckert-and-christopher-paul-carey/

Wold Newton Primer: http://www.thepulp.net/pulp-info/pulp-articles/wold-newton/

Official Philip Jose Farmer Website: http://pjfarmer.com

Meteor House Press: http://meteorhousepress.com

Wold Newton Universe :http://www.pjfarmer.com/woldnewton/Pulp.htm

Episode Title Card W/ Who’s Who: http://pulpcrazy.com/094.png

Wold Newton Monument: http://pulpcrazy.com/monument.jpg

Wold Newton Family Tree from Tarzan: Alive: http://pulpcrazy.com/tarzantreechart.png

Wold Newton Family Tree from Doc Savage: HAL: http://pulpcrazy.com/doctreechart.png

Google Map w/graphics of the Wold Newton crash site: http://pulpcrazy.com/crashsitemap.png

Pulp Crazy: http://pulpcrazy.com

Pulp Crazy – Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle, Congo Christmas OTR

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/093.mp3

This week Pulp Crazy will be getting into the Christmas Spirit with an Old Time Radio episode starring a pulp character. Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle. This particular episode is titled Congo Christmas and it first aired on 12/20/1951.

This Christmas Themed episode takes place before the Christmas holiday, with Tarzan and his companian N’Kima the monkey vising the village of Karmiki, . Besides the local tribe, the village is home to a Christian Mission run by the Reverend Collier. The beliefs of Christianity are at odds with the native religion led by the High Priest of Neomopo the Moon God. Things are further complicated when two younger members of the tribe from different religions fall in love, and wish to marry. Each of their respective religions are resistant to the marriage. During this conflict, the Eye of Neomopo, a brilliant blue sapphire goes missing, further complicating the climate inside the village.

Links:

ERBZine Article on the Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle Radio Series: http://www.erbzine.com/mag23/2337.html

Old Time Radio Shows on ERBZINE: http://www.erbzine.com/otr/

Christmas Themed Old Time Radio Shows on Archive.org: https://archive.org/details/500OTRChristmasShows

Old Time Radio Lovers Group on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2205196203/

Edgar Rice Burroughs Website: http://www.edgarriceburroughs.com/

 

Ron Marz Interview – John Carter: Warlord of Mars

00Layout 1Layout 1Layout 1Layout 1Layout 1

Ron Marz is no stranger to comic book readers. Looking at his comicbookdb profile he’s almost run the alphabetical gamut as a writer. Seriously, he’s just missing series with titles starting with K, L, and Y.

 

While his name is most closely associated with Green Lantern (Kyle Rayner to be precise), he’s also written titles featuring pulp or pulp style characters. These include the Batman/Tarzan: Claws of the Cat-Woman mini for DC, Hellboy: Weird Tales #5 for Dark Horse, Conan: The Isle of No Return mini from Dark Horse, The Phantom Annual for Moonstone, and Red Sonja #30 for Dynamite Comics.

His recent foray into the pulp comics world was the mash-up The Shadow Over Innsmouth from Dynamite Entertainment. A trip to Barsoom is currently in the cards for Ron with John Carter: Warlord of Mars from Dynamite Entertainment.

 

Dynamite Entertainment and ERB Inc have reached a mutually beneficial partnership in publishing stories based on the worlds of Edgar Rice Burroughs. Hence the John Carter name in the title. John Carter: Warlord of Mars #1 hit stores last month in November. Issue #2 is due out this Wednesday November 10th. Ron graciously answered some of Pulp Crazy’s questions about the new series.

 

Pulp Crazy: Ron, first let me say thanks for agreeing to the interview during what is no doubt a very busy time. I’ll just jump right into it things. First, I wanted to ask you about The Shadow Over Innsmouth one-shot from Dynamite Entertainment. You wrote that very much in the spirit of The Shadow pulp magazines, without using any of the supernatural elements developed for the radio show or comic books. Was that a conscious effort?

Ron Marz: I wanted to stick with what was essentially a crime story with supernatural overtones. Obviously if you actually bring Cthulhu into the story, the Shadow isn’t really the dominant force in the plot anymore. But more than that, I really wanted to stick to the elements that are in the original “Innsmouth” story. The Elder Gods don’t really rise from the depths and make a big appearance in that story, it’s much more of a mysterious, moody piece.

PC: Speaking of Pulps, when did you first discover Edgar Rice Burroughs and Barsoom? What is your favorite Edgar Rice Burroughs book? Your favorite Edgar Rice Burroughs character?

RM: I discovered all of the Burroughs stuff at just the right age, maybe 11 or 12, and devoured all of it. I think the stuff that you latch onto at that magic age is the stuff that stays with you for the rest of your life. I don’t know that I have one specific favorite book, but the Mars books are my favorite series. And if I had to pick one character as a favorite, I suppose it would be Tarzan, just because he appears in so many more adventures than John Carter.

PC: John Carter: Warlord of Mars, how are you approaching this new series continuity wise? Is it set within a certain period of the Edgar Rice Burroughs original stories, or is this in a new continuity? Can you tease at the plot for the first arc?

RM: I’m not getting overly precious with the continuity in terms of exactly when these stories take place, other than the “classic” period with John and Dejah front and center. Continuity should be a tool a writer uses, not the other way around. I wanted to do a big story for the first arc, so we’re jumping in with a six-issue storyline initially. One of my main goals, in addition to firmly establishing the characters and setting, is to introduce a villain who’s actually worthy of John Carter’s prowess. So in the first issue, we meet Captain Joshua Clark, a Union officer, who is in many ways John Carter’s complete opposite number.

 

PC: Who really is John Carter? One big mystery has always been John Carter’s past. In the original stories he never recalled his childhood. As long as he can remember he has been a fighting man in his physical prime. Do you plan to address this in the new series?

RM: You know, I’ve toyed with the idea of exploring that a bit, but so far I keep coming back to the notion that sometimes it’s good to let a mystery remain a mystery. I think I liked Wolverine better when we didn’t know his past, when his “origin” hadn’t been revealed. Not all stories have to be told.

PC: The covers feature John Carter and Dejah Thoris quite prominently, as well as Tars Tarkas and Woola. Can you give us an idea of who the main cast will be?

RM: You just named them. As far as I’m concerned, those are the characters that the audience wants to read about, and they’re certainly the characters that I want to write about. It’s the same as when I wrote “Star Wars” comics for Dark Horse. I wanted to write stories about Luke and Han and Leia and Darth Vader, not the third Storm Trooper on the left.

PC: Starting with the fourth book in the series, John Carter takes a backseat to new Barsoomian heroes. Will Carthoris, Thuvia and Kantos Kan play any roles? I have to admit my favorite character is Gahan of Gahol, from The Chessmen of Mars, any plans for him to show up?

RM: I’d like to eventually work in all those characters, but my plans for the foreseeable future are to concentrate on John, Dejah and Tars. Honestly, I’ve wanted to write these characters since I was 11 years old, so I’m going to make them my focus.

PC: I hear you are putting the War into Warlord when it comes to this new series. Can you describe the tone of the book? Will this be written as story arcs or serialized single issue stories?

RM: The original novels are full of action — chase scenes, escapes, sword fights. The comics are going to be action-oriented as well. I don’t think anyone is showing up to see John and Dejah have tea. I’m approaching this in much the same manner that I approach anything that I write. It’s all meant to be character-driven, and visually appealing. These are comics. If we’re not giving you something interesting and exciting to look at, you might as well go read a book without any pictures. My plan is to alternate between longer arcs and shorter ones, with some single-issue stories thrown in as well.

PC: What is it like not only Dynamite Entertainment, but also Edgar Rice Buroughs Inc? Can you give us an idea of how the creative process goes? Do both entities have to sign off on plots and story ideas, as well as the finished product?

RM: Both Dynamite and Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc., have given me a pretty free hand with these stories. I have a relationship with ERB, Inc. already, since I’m writing a couple of weekly strips for their website. I’m writing “Korak,” with art by Rick Leonardi, and “The Mucker,” with art by Lee Moder, and coloring on both by Neeraj Menon. The work of Burroughs played a huge part in me wanting to become a writer. So I feel like I’m repaying some of that debt by working on these projects. Being trusted to follow the footsteps of Edgar Rice Burroughs is absolutely an honor.

PC: You are working with Abhishek Malsuni on John Carter: Warlord of Mars, how is Barsoom looking through his lens? What was your first reaction to his interior artwork on the book?

RM: I’m thrilled with what Abhishek and the rest of the art team are doing. I had worked with Abhishek on some projects for the Indian comics market, and even then I felt like his style would be a great fit for John Carter stories. I feel very fortunate that the whole thing has fallen into place. You’ll have to take my word for it, since only the first issue is out so far, but each issue looks better than the previous one.

PC: Anything you want to say to fans of classic Edgar Rice Burroughs characters? Do you think this will be up their alley?

RM: I would hope that fans of Edgar Rice Burroughs are already reading the book, and I hope they’re pleased with what we’re doing. I also hope we’re able to lure in readers who haven’t been exposed to this material before. That’s going to be the real test of what we’re doing, reeling in people who haven’t visited Barsoom previously. I want everybody, old fans and new ones alike.

 

Thanks Ron, and congrats on living out one of your childhood dreams! See you on Barsoom!bombshellcover

Pulp Crazy – Krampusnacht by Josh Reynolds

 

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/092.mp3

In this weeks episode I’ll be getting into the holiday spirit with Krampusnacht by Josh Reynolds. It’s a short story that features The Royal Occultist, Charles St. Cyprian and his apprentice Ebe Gallowglass.

St. Cyprian holds the post of the Royal Occultist, sometimes called the Queen’s Conjurer. The post was first held by the historical figure, John Dee, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. Other notable Royal Occultists include the First Earl of Holderness, as well as Thomas Carnacki the Ghost-Finder.

The Royal Occultist is an ongoing series of stories. Reynold’s has written both short fiction and novels based around The Royal Occultist. There have been numerous pieces of short fiction published, with more on the way. The two novels are The White Chapel Demon and the recently released The Jade Suit of Death. As of this episode, the adventures take place between 1913 and 1925. In the three of the earlier tales, St. Cyprian is working alongside Carnicki as his apprentice. However, the meat of the series seems to take place in the early to mid 1920’s.

The series definitely falls into the occult detective subsection of Weird Fiction, but it also has ties into the Wold Newton Universe of Philip Jose Farmer.

 

Links:

The Royal Occultist Primer: http://royaloccultist.wordpress.com/a-royal-occultist-primer/

The Royal Occultist Haunted Holidays: http://royaloccultist.wordpress.com/2014/11/16/the-royal-occultist-haunted-holidays-2/

The Royal Occultist Website: http://royaloccultist.wordpress.com/

Josh Reynold’s Website: https://joshuamreynolds.wordpress.com/

The Art of MD Jackson: http://mdjacksonart.weebly.com/

The Gotterdammerung Gavotte at Lovecraft E-Zine: http://lovecraftzine.com/magazine/issues/2012-2/issue-18-october-2012/the-gotterdammerung-gavotte-by-josh-reynolds/

The Bells of Northam at Lovecraft E-Zine: http://lovecraftzine.com/magazine/issues/2013-2/issue-27-october-2013/the-bells-of-northam-by-joshua-reynolds/

The Whitechapel Demon at Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/kk36psw

The Jade Suit of Death at Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/nzg7ek4

Phileas Fogg and the War of Shadows Review: http://lovecraftzine.com/2014/08/22/review-phileas-fogg-and-the-war-of-shadows-by-josh-reynolds/

Buy Phileas Fogg and the War of Shadows: http://meteorhousepress.com/phileas-fogg-and-the-war-of-shadows/

Meteor House Press Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MeteorHouse

Meteor House Press email: sales@meteorhousepress.com

Krampus: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krampus

John Dee: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Dee

Thomas Carnacki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnacki

Wold Newton Universe: http://www.pjfarmer.com/woldnewton/Pulp.htm

 

The Sword Women of Robert E. Howard & C.L. Moore: The Lineage of Red Sonja

 

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/091.mp3

In this weeks episode I will be covering the Sword Women of Robert E. Howard & C.L. Moore, and their connection to the comic book character of Red Sonja. I think this is one of the best examples of how classic pulp characters are still influencing fiction today.

I’ve wanted to do this episode for a few years now, it was just a matter of reading all of the pulp tales with these ladies in them. I will discuss each of the 4 red haired Sword Women, in the order of their creation.

Sources/Links:

Sword Women Timeline: http://PULPCRAZY.COM/?page_id=692

Purchase Sword Women & Other Historical Adventures by Robert E. Howard: http://tinyurl.com/mbmrzoa

Purchase Black God’s Kiss from C.L. Moore: http://tinyurl.com/obret9k

Read The Shadow of the Vulture by Robert E. Howard: http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks06/0608101.txt

Read Hellsgarde by C.L. Moore: http://www.pulpmags.org/PDFs/WT_1939_04.pdf

Dark Agnes: http://www.blackgate.com/2009/12/29/howard%E2%80%99s-forgotten-redhead-dark-agnes/

Jirel of Joiry: http://www.blackgate.com/jirel-of-joiry-the-mother-of-us-all/

Red Sonja/Sonya Agreement:
http://www.rehtwogunraconteur.com/?p=1942
http://www.conan.com/f_redsonya.shtml

 

Red Sonja Prose Novels at BlackGate: http://www.blackgate.com/2013/04/09/red-sonja-the-novels/

Wikis

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Sonja

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark_Agnes_de_Chastillon

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jirel_of_Joiry

Companies:

Dark Horse: http://www.darkhorse.com/

Dynamite: http://www.dynamite.com/htmlfiles/

Conan: http://www.conan.com/invboard/

Pulp Crazy – Honorary Pulp Heroes

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/090.mp3

In this weeks episode I will be discussing Honorary Pulp Characters. These are characters who are often referred to as pulp, and have been kind of adopted by the some of the pulp community. I should say, the opinions in this episode are solely my own logic. I’m not speaking for the pulp community as a whole, this is just one fan’s opinion.. Heck, during the course of writing this episode, I even found out that one of these character is in fact a true pulp character if I apply my logic to the situation. I make sure to give him his props.

I just focused on American characters, as tackling the German and French characters who are referred to as pulp characters could be a whole other episode, and I’m not very knowledgeable about either set.

Clarification on Fu Manchu appearing in the Golden Scorpion:

http://njedge.net/~knapp/books.htm

He appears, but is not named.

 

Links:

 

Honey West: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honey_West

Captain Midnight: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Captain_Midnight

Fu Manchu: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fu_Manchu

Miss Fury: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Fury_(comics)

The Rocketeer: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocketeer

The Phantom: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Phantom

The Green Hornet & Kato: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_Hornet

 

Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan Review

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/089.mp3

 

In this weeks episode I will be discussing a movie based on a pulp character. Actually, the most well known pulp character of all. Tarzan. The title of the film is Greystoke, the Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes. It’s quite a mouthful, but I generally hear it referred to as simply Greystoke.

The film was released on March 30, 1984 and is based on the novel Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs. The film was directed by Hugh Hudson, who is best known for directing Chariots of Fire.

Greystoke stars Christopher Lambert as Tarzan, although he is never referred to by this name during the film. He is called John, Johnny, or Lord Greystoke. Andie MacDowell plays Jane Porter, and Ian Holm is Philippe D’Arnot. Sir Ralph Richardson played the Earl of Greystoke, Tarzan’s grandfather.

While the film is not 100% faithful to the original novel, I believe the spirit of Tarzan was captured.

Links:

Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan on Amazon Prime: http://tinyurl.com/o7fdmmj

Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan on Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/nq9meaz

Greystoke @ wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greystoke:_The_Legend_of_Tarzan,_Lord_of_the_Apes

Edgar Rice Burroughs: http://www.edgarriceburroughs.com/

Philip Jose Farmer: http://pjfarmer.com/

 

 

Pulp Crazy – John Carter: Warlord of Mars #1 Review

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/088.mp3

In this weeks episode I will be reviewing John Carter: Warlord of Mars #1 from Dynamite Entertainment. The comic is written by Ron Marz and illustrated by Abishek Malsuni. Nanjan Jamberi lends some amazing colors and Rob Steen is on lettering.

The comic just came out this week, so I wanted to put up a review, as this is a pretty big occasion. This is the first authorized John Carter comic we’ve seen since Marvel put them out a few years back to coincide with the Disney Movie. Dynamite has been publishing comics set around the public domain John Carter stories, but a settlement has been reached between Dynamite and Edgar Rice Burroughs Inc. that allows for new, authorized tales to be told. John Carter: Warlord of Mars #1 marks the beginning of this partnership.

 

Links:

Buy the comic on Comixology: https://www.comixology.com/John-Carter-Warlord-of-Mars-1-Digital-Exclusive-Edition/digital-comic/160794

Comic Shop Locator: http://www.comicshoplocator.com/storelocator

Edgar Rice Burroughs Website: http://www.edgarriceburroughs.com/

Dynamite Entertainment: http://www.dynamite.com/htmlfiles/

Edgar Rice Burroughs Online Comic Strips: http://www.edgarriceburroughs.com/comics/

Barsoom @wikipedia:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barsoom

Pulp Crazy – The Chain by H. Warner Munn

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/087.mp3

The supernatural and horror themed episodes for October comes to a close with this weeks short story. The Chain by H. Warner Munn. It first appeared in the April 1928 issue of Weird Tales.

This is a story firmly set in the horror genre, but without any real supernatural elements. It’s actually somewhat realistic and is a tale of torture (both mental and physical).. It deals with a man being trapped in his cousin’s castle, and the unique brand of tortures the cousin inflicts on him.

Links:

The Chain at ISFDB: http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?57463

H. Warner Munn at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._Warner_Munn

H. Warner Munn Interview with Jessica Amanda Salmonson: https://web.archive.org/web/20130628075234/http://www.violetbooks.com/Munn.html

Wilum Pugmire talks H. Warner Munn: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XZ-YOjDQFek

H. Warner Munn and Philip Jose Famer Photo: http://www.pjfarmer.com/photoal.htm

H. Warner Munn at ISFDB: http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/ea.cgi?1802

Christopher Paul Carey Blog – http://cpcarey.blogspot.com/ (Thanks to Chris for the H. Warner Munn reference materials)