Pulp Crazy – Totem and Taboo by Philip José Farmer

In this weeks episode I will be discussing Totem and Taboo by Philip José Farmer. February 25, 2015 marked six years since the passing of this enormous talent, so I decided to read one of his stories in remembrance of him. By coincidence, or fate, a copy of The Grand Adventure arrived in the mail on the 25th. These is a beautifully illustrated collection published by Byron Preiss and Berkley Books, which contains some PJF stories I’ve been dying to read. The Totem and Taboo title caught my interest, and after reading Farmer’s introduction to it, I just had to read it. The story itself isn’t very long, Farmer’s introduction is nearly as long as the story itself. But he conveys some interesting points and background material in the introduction.

Totem and Taboo combines two of Farmer’s interests, Psychotherapy and Totems. The name of the story being identical to a thesis by Sigmund Freud isn’t a coincidence. In the introduction, Farmer says this story has nothing to do with Freud’s thesis, but then again he also says it might after all. Farmer had an interest in psychotherapy and psychology, which played a big part in his World of Tiers novel, Red Orc’s Rage.

PJF also gives some serious thoughts about animals towards the beginning of the intro, as well as comparing and contrasting their actions to humans. This kind of thinking is seen from him in other works relating to feral humans. Of course, totems play a part of the Khokarsa series, with Hadon of Ancient Opar being a member of the Ant Totem, and Kwasin of Dythbeth being a member of the Thunder Bear totem.

According to Farmer, at the conclusion of his intro, no psychologist or psychoanalyst, as far as he was aware had combined zoology with their particular school of theory or technique. Farmer mused that maybe they should look into this.

Links:

Totem & Taboo at ISFDB: http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?58170

Philip José Farmer on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Philip-Jose-Farmer/e/B000APAEPG/

The Grand Adventure on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Grand-Adventure-Philip-Jose-Farmer/dp/0425072118/

The Book of Philip José Farmer on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Book-Philip-Jos%C3%A9-Farmer/dp/B0006F1Q1G/

Official Philip José Farmer Website: http://pjfarmer.com

Meteor House Press:  http://meteorhousepress.com

Pulp Crazy – Brotherhood of the Wolf

 

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/101.mp3

This weeks episode was inspired by my talk with Jean-Marc Lofficier of Black Coat Press last week. During Jean-Marc’s discussion of French Cinema, he mentioned Brotherhood of the Wolf, or Le Pacte des Loups. This is one of my favorite cult movies, so I thought I would re-watch it and do an episode on it this week. I wouldn’t call it a pulp movie, but it certainly would be at home in Weird Tales magazine, and the lead characters could have their own series in Adventure magazine.

Brotherhood of the Wolf is a historical horror/action movie directed by Christophe Gans, based on the Beast of Gevaudan. It was released in January 2001 in France, and came out here in the US in September 2001.

The King sends his Royal Taxidermist and knight, Grégoire de Fronsac played wonderfully by Samuel Le Bihan to investigate and identify the beast. De Fronsac is a well traveled guy, having been to the Americas. He’s a naturalist, soldier, and a very talented artist. Accompanying De Fronsac is his Iroquois friend, Mani, who is of the Mohawk tribe. Mani is De Fronsac’s best friend and blood brother. Mani is played by Mark Dacascos, and his martial arts abilities are utilized in the film.

The film seems to be out of print, but some vendors are still selling copies on Amazon.

Links:

Brotherhood of the Wolf on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Brotherhood-Wolf-Christophe-Gans/dp/B00006ADEM

Pulp Crazy Episode 100 – French Pulp Fiction with Jean-Marc Lofficier

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/100.mp3

In this special 100th episode of Pulp Crazy, I’m joined by Jean-Marc Lofficier of Black Coat Press. Jean-Marc, a writer, editor, and publisher has a vast knowledge of what has come to be known as French Pulp Fiction. Jean-Marc takes us through history and describes the authors, characters, and concepts pioneered in French popular literature. We also discuss the catalog of Black Coat Press, and Jean-Marc discusses some of the titles they have released, and what is coming down the pipeline. All of this, plus French movie serials, cinema, and even some Philip Jose Farmer talk are thrown into the mix.

It was a pleasure to have Jean-Marc on the show, and I’m grateful he agreed to come on and share his knowledge about French Pulp Fiction.

 

Links:

Black Coat Press: http://www.blackcoatpress.com/

Black Coat Press on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Black-Coat-Press/337697694704?ref=mf

The French Wold Newton Universe: http://www.coolfrenchcomics.com/wnu1.htm

Cool French Comics: http://www.coolfrenchcomics.com/

Black Coat Press on Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/bcamazonkindle

Jean-Marc Lofficier at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-Marc_Lofficier

Jean-Marc Lofficier at ComicBookDB: http://comicbookdb.com/creator.php?ID=6001

 

 

Pulp Crazy – The Pit of the Serpent by Robert E. Howard

 

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/099.mp3

In this weeks episode I will be discussing The Pit of the Serpent by Robert E. Howard. The Pit of the Serpent was first published in the July 1929 issue of Fight Stories, and is now in the public domain. It is the first published tale featuring Sailor Steve Costigan, one of Howard’s most popular characters. The story takes place in the Philippines, Manila to be precise. I would also say it takes place around the year it was first published, 1929.

 

Links:
The Pit of the Serpent at Project Gutenberg Australia: http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks06/0607341h.html

 

The Pit of the Serpent at Wikisource: http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Pit_of_the_Serpent

 

The Robert E. Howard Foundation: http://www.rehfoundation.org/

 

Official Robert E. Howard Forums:  http://www.conan.com/invboard/

Pulp Crazy – Two Hawks From Earth by Philip Jose Farmer

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/098.mp3

This is a bonus episode in celebration of Philip Jose Farmer’s birthday today, he was born on January 26th, 1918. Farmer wrote for the pulps when he was first starting out in the 1950’s, before the pulp magazines disappeared from existence. Long after the pulps died, he continued to write pulp themed tales as novels, in addition to his vast body of work in science fiction. One of these pulp themed or styled novels is Two Hawks From Earth.

It was originally published under the title of The Gate of Time in 1966 (a title Farmer was not pleased with). The story was revised and expanded in 1969 when it was published under the proper title Two Hawks From Earth. Two Hawks From Earth was reprinted in 1985, but I recommend the most recent printing from Monkey Brain Books in 2009 due to the informative afterword by Christopher Paul Carey. Chris goes into Farmer’s aviation experience, Farmer’s science fiction writing, Farmer’s interest in anthropology and linguistics, and the homages in the novel to the works of Edgar Rice Burroughs. Chris also delves into the differences between the original publication, The Gates of Creation and Two Hawks From Earth.

Two Hawks From Earth is often described as an Alternate History novel, but while the spirit of alternate history fiction is in there, the hero of the story Roger Two Hawks actually visits an alternate dimension whose history has played out quite differently.

On this Earth (which is spelled Eorthe), the continent of North America never rose above sea-level. The only evidence of North America are the highest points of our mountain ranges which are a chain of islands on this Earth. Since North America never existed, the Bering Strait Ice Bridge never existed for the ancestors of present day Native American to travel across.

Links:

Purchase Two Hawks From Earth on Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/m3z2qn8

A fanmade map of Eorthe: http://www.alternatehistory.com/discussion/showthread.php?p=208454&highlight=haws#post208454

The Official Philip Jose Farmer Website: http://pjfarmer.com/

The Worlds of Philip Jose Farmer Volume 3: http://meteorhousepress.com/the-worlds-of-jose-farmer-3/

The Philip Jose Farmer International Bibliography: http://rnuninga.home.xs4all.nl/

Christopher Paul Carey’s Website: http://cpcarey.com/

Heidi Ruby Miller’s Website: http://www.heidirubymiller.com/

Fables For Little Folk by Robert E. Howard

 

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/Dempsey.mp3

Pulp Crazy would like to wish a Happy Birthday to Robert E. Howard. In honor of Howard’s Birthday today I will be reading a short fable he wrote. Fables For Little Folk, a boxing fable about legendary heavyweight champion Jack Dempsey.

Links:

Fables For Little Folk: http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Fables_For_Little_Folk

Robert E. Howard: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_E._Howard

Jack Dempsey: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Dempsey

Robert E. Howard Foundation: http://www.rehfoundation.org/

Robert E. Howard Forums: http://conan.com

Pulp Crazy – Marchers of Valhalla by Robert E. Howard

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/097.mp3

In this weeks episode Pulp Crazy is continuing the celebration of Robert E. Howard’s birth month with a short story not published in Howard’s lifetime. The story is titled, “Marchers of Valhalla” and is a part of his James Allison series, which are reincarnation tales.

This story was first published in 1972 by Donald M. Grant. I had the pleasure of reading it in the newest publication from the Robert E. Howard Foundation, titled “Swords of the North”, which collects Howard’s Viking and Celtic stories, drafts and fragments.

Marchers of Valhalla was able to be completed thanks to combining multiple drafts by Howard together, into one coherent story. I have to say, I’ve read a decent amount of Robert E. Howard, including all of his Solomon Kane tales, Kull stories, his Dark Agnes tales, all but the final two Conan stories, and a fair amount of his stand alone Weird Fiction. I would rank Marchers of Valhalla as one of my favorites.

Links:

Swords of the North at the Robert E. Howard Foundation: http://www.rehfoundation.org/2014/11/05/swords-of-the-north/

Marchers of Valhalla Discussion at the Robert E. Howard Forums: http://www.conan.com/invboard/index.php?showtopic=5423

Hyborian Age America Discussion at the Robert E. Howard Forums: http://www.conan.com/invboard/index.php?showtopic=8902&page=1

Swords of the North Discussion Thread: http://www.conan.com/invboard/index.php?showtopic=10938

Hyborian Age Map: http://www.oocities.org/gmredux/hyboria/images/hyboria_bw.gif

Marchers of Valhalla at ISFDB: http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?63590

The Kingdom of Shadows by Clark Ashton Smith

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/CAS.mp3

I am a few days late on this, but I wanted to do something in honor of Clark Ashton Smith’s birthday. CAS was born on January 13, 1893. He was a creative individual with many talents: writing, poetry, and artwork. He is also one of the Weird Tales Big Three along with H.P. Lovecraft and Robert E. Howard.

The text for this poem, as well as the background image was found on The Eldritch Dark, the premier CAS website.. When I came across “The Kingdom of Shadows” I knew I found what I was looking for.

In hindsight, a background image depicting Zothique, rather than Hyperborea may have been more appropriate, given the contents of the poem.

Links:

Eldritch Dark: http://www.eldritchdark.com/

The Double Shadow Clark Ashton Smith Podcast: http://thedoubleshadow.com/

Clark Ashton Smith @Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clark_Ashton_Smith

Clark Ashton Smith @ISFDB: http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/ea.cgi?819

Clark Ashton Smith @ Tellers of Weird Tales: http://tellersofweirdtales.blogspot.com/search?q=Clark+Ashton+Smith

The Kingdom of Shadows at Wikisource: http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Kingdom_of_Shadows

PulpFest 2012 – Conan and The Birth of Sword & Sorcery

 

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/conanpanel.mp3

Rusty Burke, Don Herron, Brian Leno, and Bill Cavalier discuss the contributions of Robert E. Howard and Conan The Cimmerian to the birth of Sword & Sorcery. Some great overall Robert E. Howard discussion as well.

Links:

The Robert E. Howard Foundation: http://www.rehfoundation.org/
Official Robert E. Howard Forums: http://conan.com

The Cimmerian: http://leogrin.com/CimmerianBlog/

REH: Two-Gun Raconteur: http://www.rehtwogunraconteur.com/

REHUPA: http://www.rehupa.com/

Rusty Burke on Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/nl6ymxt
Don Herron on Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/onqbosu

PulpFest 2012 – The Illustrated Conan

 

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/conanartpanel.mp3

 

First installment of the celebration of Robert E. Howard’s birthmonth at Pulp Crazy.

From Pulpfest 2012 – The Illustrated Conan Panel – Jim and Ruth Keegan, along with Mark Schultz, offer a look at Conan of Cimmeria as depicted by various illustrators over the last eight decades and offer a modern perspective on illustrating Robert E. Howard’s immortal character.

True to the theme of the panel, there was art present via a slideshow. I have compiled some images via Google Images that I believe are the pictures used, or fairly close. I do not own any of these images, I have just put them on PulpCrazy’s server for preservation against possible future dead links.

Mike Neno’s website has a picture of this panel: http://eventized.blogspot.com/2012/08/pulpfest-2012-day-iii.html

Jim Keegan was kind enough to provide his original slides below:

 

These were my best guesses prior to Jim sending me the actual sliders. Click on the images below while listening to the panel if you would like. I put them in order as best as I could.

(I can’t remember the exact Frazetta’s shown.)

Frank Frazetta:

http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/001%20-%20Frazetta.jpg
http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/002%20-%20Frazetta.jpg
http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/002a-Frazetta.jpg
http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/002b-Frazetta.jpg
http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/002c-Frazetta.jpg
http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/002d-Frazetta.jpg
http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/002e-Frazetta.jpg
http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/002f-Frazetta.jpg

(These are my best guesses for pictures used on the following artists)

John Buscema: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/003-Buscema.jpg
Barry Windsor Smith: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/003-%20BWS.jpg
Jeff Jones: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/004-Jeff%20Jones.jpg
Bernie Wrightson: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/005-Bernie%20Wrightson.jpg
Alex Toth: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/006-Alex%20Toth.jpg
Jack Kirby: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/007-Jack%20Kirby.jpg
John Byrne: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/008-John%20Byrne.jpg
Mike Mignola: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/009-Mike%20Mignola.jpg
Bill Sienkiewicz: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/010-BillS.jpg
Wally Wood: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/011-WallyW.jpg

(I can’t remember what the worst Conan cover was, or the context)
Margaret Brundage:

http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/012-brundagea.jpg
http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/012-brundageb.jpg
http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/012-brundagec.jpg

Jayem Wilcox: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/013-jayemwilcox.jpg

Harold S. Delay – Weird Tales – Red Nails:
http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/014-RedNailsWT-HS%20Delay.png
http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/014-RednailsWTb.png
http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/014-RedNailsWTc.png

Hugh Rankin – Weird Tales:

http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/015-hughrankin.jpg
http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/015-hughrankina.jpg
http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/015-hughrankinb.jpg
Fantastic Worlds: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/016-FantasticWorlds.jpg

Unable to find the Red Ruin Logo from the REHUPA Mailings

Wandering Star Editions: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/018-WanderingStar.jpg
Frank Kelly Freas: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/019-FrankKellyFreas.jpg
Edward M. Shmeller (SP?): http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/020-EdwardMShmeller.jpg
Jim & Ruth Keegan: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/021-Jim&Ruth.jpg
Gary Gianni: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/022-Gianni.jpg
Gregory Manchess: http://pulpcrazy.com…PirateConan.png
Mark Schultz: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/024-Schultza.jpg
Mark Schultz: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/024-SchultzSketch.jpg
N.C. Wyeth: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/025-NCWyeth.jpg  (This may not be the image shown at the panel)
Frank Leyendecker: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/026-Frank%20Leyendecker.jpg  (This may not be the image shown at the panel)
John Allen St. John: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/027-J.%20Allen%20St.John%20WT.jpg
Jack Dempsey: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/028-Dempsey.jpg
Harry Houdini: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/029-Houdini.jpg
Eugen Sandow: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/030-Sandow.jpg
Douglas Fairbanks: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/031-Fairbanks.jpg
Keegan Scan of Muscle REH: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/032-REHKreeganScan.jpg

Jim and Ruth Keegan Conan Pin-Up: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/033-JimRuthConan-Pinup.jpg

Jim and Ruth Keegan: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/033b-JimRuthConanb.jpg

Jim and Ruth Keegan: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/033c-JimRuthConana.jpg

Jim and Ruth Keeganhttp://pulpcrazy.com/reh/033-JimRuthBlackstone.jpg
Fritz Lang’s Siegfried: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/034-FritzLangSiegfried.jpg

John Gilbert; http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/036-JohnGilbert.jpg

Unable to locate an image of the exact Two Gun Bob Strip they talk about featuring Gilbert.

Mark Schultz: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/038-MarkQueen.jpg
Mark Schultz: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/039-MarkDustJacket.jpg

(I do not have images for all the in between steps of the Swordwoman Cover by John Watkiss. Just the initial and final result)

John Watkiss initial cover: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/040-JohnWatkiss.png
John Watkiss final cover: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/041-JohnWatkiss.jpg
Mark Schultz: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/042-Schultz.jpg
Jim and Ruth Keegan: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/043-JimRuth.jpg
Jim and Ruth Keegan: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/044-JimRuth.jpg
Jim and Ruth Keegan: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/045-JimRuth.jpg
Jim and Ruth Keegan: http://pulpcrazy.com/reh/046-JimRuth.jpg

Links:

Jim & Ruth Keegan’s Two Gun Blog: http://twogunblog.blogspot.com/

Jim & Ruth Keegan at Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/kr5y854

Mark Schultz Collections: http://fleskpublications.com/flesksite/index.php?route=product/category&path=18_67

(I wasn’t able to find a website for Mark)

Robert E. Howard Foundation: http://www.rehfoundation.org/

Conan.com Forums: http://www.conan.com/invboard/

 

A pulp podcast and video blog dedicated to classic pulp literature, characters, and themes.