Tag Archives: Edgar Rice Burroughs

Tarzan and the Gods of Opar Part Three by Mike Grell

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/114.mp3

In this weeks episode I will be discussing Tarzan and the Gods of Opar Part Three written and illustrated by Mike Grell. This is the third and final installment of Tarzan and the Gods of Opar and it appeared a few weeks back in Dark Horse Presents #10. Once again Grell delivers eight wonderful pages of Tarzan. I really wish Dark Horse would make Tarzan a fixture in the pages of Dark Horse Presents, and have Grell illustrate eight pages a month. This was a great story, and Dark Horse really needs to make better use of the Tarzan property in my opinion.

Links:

Preview: http://www.darkhorse.com/Comics/Previews/24-125?page=0

Buy the Digital Issue: https://digital.darkhorse.com/profile/5727.dark-horse-presents-10/

Comic Shop Locator:  http://www.comicshoplocator.com/storelocator

Mike Grell at ComicBookDB: http://comicbookdb.com/creator.php?ID=1026

More Opar goodness:

Pre-order Hadon, King of Opar: Book 4 of the Khokarsa Series by Christopher Paul Careyhttp://meteorhousepress.com/hadon-king-of-opar/

Pre-order Flight to Opar – Restored Edition Book 2 of the Khokarsa Series by Philip José Farmerhttp://meteorhousepress.com/flight-to-opar/

Pre-order Exiles of Kho: Prequel to the Khokarsa Series by Christopher Paul Careyhttp://meteorhousepress.com/exiles-of-kho-now-in-hardcover/

Christopher Paul Carey’s Website: http://www.cpcarey.com/

Purchase Hadon of Ancient Opar: Book 1 in the Khokarsa Series by Philip José Farmer: http://www.amazon.com/Hadon-Ancient-Opar-Khokarsa-Prehistory/dp/1781162956/

Purchase Kwasin & The Bear God by Philip José Farmer and Christopher Paul Carey: http://meteorhousepress.com/the-worlds-of-philip-jose-farmer-2-of-dust-and-soul/ |  http://www.amazon.com/Tales-Newton-Universe-Philip-Farmer/dp/1781163049/

Purchase Iron & Bronze by Win Scott Eckert and Christopher Paul Carey: http://www.amazon.com/Iron-Bronze-Win-Scott-Eckert-ebook/dp/B00580VNIU/

Explore the World of Lost Khokarsa Website: http://www.pjfarmer.com/khokarsa/khokarsa.htm

Bob Eggleton’s Website: http://www.bobeggleton.com/

Meteor House: http://meteorhousepress.com/

The Official Philip José Farmer Website: http://pjfarmer.com/

Philip José Farmer International Bibliography: http://www.philipjosefarmer.tk/

Review: Hadon, King of Opar by Christopher Paul Carey

 

Cover art by Bob Eggleton
Cover art by Bob Eggleton

 

Christopher Paul Carey and Meteor House graciously granted me the opportunity to read an early draft of Hadon, King of Opar. Hadon, King of Opar is the fourth book in the Khokarsa series which began with Hadon of Ancient Opar by Philip José Farmer back in 1974. Farmer wrote a sequel, Flight to Opar which followed in 1976. The conclusion to the original trilogy, The Song of Kwasin was published in 2012 in the Gods of Opar omnibus from Subterranean Press. The Song of Kwasin was co-authored by Philip José Farmer and Christopher Paul Carey. Carey also co-authored the novella, Kwasin and the Bear God with Philip José Farmer, which was first published in 2011, in The Worlds of Philip José Farmer Volume 2: Of Dust And Soul from Meteor House. It has since been reprinted in Tales of the Wold Newton Universe from Titan Books published in 2013.

In addition to co-authoring Kwasin and the Bear God and The Song of Kwasin with Farmer, Carey has also written Khokarsa tales on his own. “A Kick In the Side” was published in The Worlds of Philip José Farmer Volume 1: Protean Dimensions by Meteor House  back in 2010. Exiles of Kho was published by Meteor House  in 2012. Exiles of Kho is a novella written by Carey that acts a prequel to the Khokarsa series. The novella chronicles the discovery of the valley which will one day house the city of Opar.

Farmer passed the tenu (a Khokarsan broadsword to the uninitiated) to Carey, and he’s been continuing the chronicles of Khokarsa ever since. The new novella, Hadon, King of Opar continues Philip José Farmer’s saga of ancient Africa which draws from the works of Edgar Rice Burroughs and H. Rider Haggard. The Khokarsa series shows how the ancient cities encountered by Tarzan and Alan Quatermain actually have a shared history. Farmer was inspired by an essay written by two Edgar Rice Burroughs fans, John Harwood and Frank Brueckel, called Heritage of the Flaming God. Using the concept of Africa once having an inland sea (actually two seas, joined by a straight), he engaged in some Tolkien-esque world building, and connected his vision of Ancient Africa to the works of Burroughs and Haggard. The final product is the Khokarsa series starring Hadon of Opar and Kwasin of Dythbeth.

Hadon is the main character in Hadon of Ancient Opar and Flight to Opar. He doesn’t make an appearance until the epilogue of The Song of Kwasin, which as you can guess, focused on his cousin, Kwasin. I’m a big fan of Kwasin, but seeing Hadon take center stage once again feels very appropriate.

Hadon, King of Opar takes place 14 years after The Song of Kwasin. Hadon is no longer the young man from the first two books, he’s now forty years old and has a family. He’s also King of Opar. His wife, Lalila, is the Queen. But don’t worry, he hasn’t let himself go like all the other Khokarsan kings (Minruth and Gamori). Hadon is still a physical specimen. He’s a paragon of heroic fantasy, and an expert swordsman. The King and Queen aren’t the only familiar faces in the novella, though.

Paga, the manling and forger of the Ax of Victory plays a role in the story. Abeth, Lalila’s daughter by the fallen hero Wi has a part to play too. Abeth was only a toddler during the original books, and now she’s a young woman. Kohr, who is Hadon’s son by the deceased priestess Klyhy, is a young man now. It’s great seeing Kohr, someone who was literally conceived during the first Ancient Opar book, play a role in the newest novella. Kohr is now a Captain in the Queensguard and he wields the Ax of Victory which once belonged to his uncle (actually second cousin) Kwasin. Kebiwabes, the bard from the original books also plays a part in the new novella. Last, but certainly not least is La, the child of prophecy born on the final page of Flight to Opar. She is Hadon and Lalila’s daughter, and is now a priestess of Kho and a follower of the teachings of Lupoeth. Lupoeth is the warrior priestess featured in Exiles of Kho.

It’s great to not only see Hadon and Lalila again, but seeing their grown children taking part in the story really drives home the scope of the Khokarsa series, and Farmer’s original vision for it. A few new characters show up too. I’m certain they will quickly become fan favorites, but saying anymore would give it away. It’s best the reader discover them when Hadon does.

Carey does a great job in putting Hadon in an interesting situation from the very beginning of the story. Hadon, King of Opar is a fast paced tale where you follow Hadon’s movements while Opar is besieged by invaders. The action takes place in, around, and under the city, thanks to the subterranean tunnel system mentioned in the works of Edgar Rice Burroughs, and the original Ancient Opar novels written by Farmer. Carey and Hadon both cover a lot of ground in this novella in regards to Opar’s geography. The vast amount of research into the Opar related Edgar Rice Burroughs tales, and Farmer’s Ancient Opar stories is very evident in the text. Carey’s research, and spot on prose has allowed him to craft a great piece of action and adventure set around Opar. I don’t think there is a person on the planet more knowledgeable about the city of Opar and Khokarsa than Carey.

Carey takes great care in the mythology and history Farmer established for the series and brings elements of both into the new novella. For instance, tensions between the priests of Resu (the Sun God) and priestesses of Kho (The Mother Goddess) are still present even during Lalila and Hadon’s reign. I also enjoyed the scenes featuring Togana’no. He’s a Gokakko, one of the neanderthal people who live in shanty towns within Ancient Opar. Farmer wrote about the Gokakko in the original Ancient Opar books, and Carey developed them further in Exiles of Kho. It’s quite a contrast to see how the Gokakko are treated by Lupoeth in Exiles of Kho compared to how the people of Opar treat them in the Ancient Opar books.

When reading Hadon, King of Opar, it felt like I was reading a lost work of Philip José Farmer himself. Carey’s talent as a writer, knowledge of the works of Burroughs, Haggard, and Farmer, his education in anthropology, and interest in linguistics has allowed him to continue the Khokarsa series with the same skill and passion as Farmer. The Khokarsa series is something both authors are going to be remembered for.

If you’re a fan of Khokarsa, Hadon, King of Opar should vault to the top of your reading list. Look at that Bob Eggleton cover;  who wouldn’t want that on their bookshelf alongside the rest of the Khokarsa series? Besides an amazingly well done piece of cover art, you’re also going to get a great story.

Reading Hadon, King of Opar is like catching up with some old friends you haven’t seen in a while, then going on an adventure with them. If you’re new to Khokarsa, and are working on getting caught up, I would still preorder this book immediately. Meteor House prints a limited number of their releases, so you don’t want to miss out. Head to the Meteor House website and get your order in to guarantee your place in the party. Then return to Ancient Opar and join Hadon on another adventure.

Preorder Hadon, King of Opar: Book 4 of the Khokarsa Series by Christopher Paul Careyhttp://meteorhousepress.com/hadon-king-of-opar/

Christopher Paul Carey’s Website: http://www.cpcarey.com/

Bob Eggleton’s Website: http://www.bobeggleton.com/

Pulp Crazy’s Interview with Christopher Paul Carey on the book:

 

Talking Hadon, King of Opar by Christopher Paul Carey

MP3: http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/113.mp3

Christopher Paul Carey joins me in discussing his new novella, Hadon, King of Opar, now available for pre-order from Meteor House. This is the all-new fourth volume in Philip José Farmer’s Khokarsa (Ancient Opar) series. Chris fills us in on how the story came into existence, his writing process, and what Hadon’s up to. We took great care in not discussing spoilers.

I was able to review an advanced review copy of an early draft, and this novella has my highest recommendation. Look for my review next week on http://pulpcrazy.com.

Hadon, King of Opar is now available for pre-order from Meteor House. It’s available in both hardcover and softcover format at the link below. 

 

Pre-order Hadon, King of Opar: Book 4 of the Khokarsa Series by Christopher Paul Careyhttp://meteorhousepress.com/hadon-king-of-opar/

Pre-order Flight to Opar – Restored Edition Book 2 of the Khokarsa Series by Philip José Farmerhttp://meteorhousepress.com/flight-to-opar/

Pre-order Exiles of Kho: Prequel to the Khokarsa Series by Christopher Paul Careyhttp://meteorhousepress.com/exiles-of-kho-now-in-hardcover/

Christopher Paul Carey’s Website: http://www.cpcarey.com/

Purchase Hadon of Ancient Opar: Book 1 in the Khokarsa Series by Philip José Farmer: http://www.amazon.com/Hadon-Ancient-Opar-Khokarsa-Prehistory/dp/1781162956/

Purchase Kwasin & The Bear God by Philip José Farmer and Christopher Paul Carey: http://meteorhousepress.com/the-worlds-of-philip-jose-farmer-2-of-dust-and-soul/ |  http://www.amazon.com/Tales-Newton-Universe-Philip-Farmer/dp/1781163049/

Purchase Iron & Bronze by Win Scott Eckert and Christopher Paul Carey: http://www.amazon.com/Iron-Bronze-Win-Scott-Eckert-ebook/dp/B00580VNIU/

Explore the World of Lost Khokarsa Website: http://www.pjfarmer.com/khokarsa/khokarsa.htm

Bob Eggleton’s Website: http://www.bobeggleton.com/

Meteor House: http://meteorhousepress.com/

The Official Philip José Farmer Website: http://pjfarmer.com/

Philip José Farmer International Bibliography: http://www.philipjosefarmer.tk/

 

Talking Flight to Opar Restored Edition by Philip José Farmer with Christopher Paul Carey

 

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/112.mp3

Author and editor, Christopher Paul Carey joins me in discussing the Restored Edition of Philip José Farmer’s Flight to Opar, now available for pre-order from Meteor House. Chris is the editor of the book and we delve into how he went about restoring the text for this edition. Chris even provides a sneak peak by citing some examples directly from the book, to give us an idea of what type of material has been restored. This is the new definitive text of Flight to Opar.

Flight to Opar – The  Restored Edition is now available for pre-order from Meteor House. It’s available in both hardcover and softcover format at the link below.

Pre-order Flight to Opar – Restored Edition Book 2 of the Khokarsa Series by Philip José Farmerhttp://meteorhousepress.com/flight-to-opar/

Pre-order Hadon, King of Opar: Book 4 of the Khokarsa Series by Christopher Paul Careyhttp://meteorhousepress.com/hadon-king-of-opar/

Pre-order Exiles of Kho: Prequel to the Khokarsa Series by Christopher Paul Careyhttp://meteorhousepress.com/exiles-of-kho-now-in-hardcover/

Purchase Hadon of Ancient Opar: Book 1 in the Khokarsa Series by Philip José Farmer: http://www.amazon.com/Hadon-Ancient-Opar-Khokarsa-Prehistory/dp/1781162956/

Purchase Kwasin & The Bear God by Philip José Farmer and Christopher Paul Carey: http://meteorhousepress.com/the-worlds-of-philip-jose-farmer-2-of-dust-and-soul/ |  http://www.amazon.com/Tales-Newton-Universe-Philip-Farmer/dp/1781163049/

Purchase Iron & Bronze by Win Scott Eckert and Christopher Paul Carey: http://www.amazon.com/Iron-Bronze-Win-Scott-Eckert-ebook/dp/B00580VNIU/

Christopher Paul Carey’s Website: http://www.cpcarey.com/

Explore the World of Lost Khokarsa Website: http://www.pjfarmer.com/khokarsa/khokarsa.htm

Bob Eggleton’s Website: http://www.bobeggleton.com/

Meteor House: http://meteorhousepress.com/

The Official Philip José Farmer Website: http://pjfarmer.com/

Philip José Farmer International Bibliography: http://www.philipjosefarmer.tk/

 

Pulp Crazy – Tarzan and the Gods of Opar Part Two by Mike Grell

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/110.mp3

In this weeks episode I’m going to be discussing Tarzan and the Gods of Opar Part Two written and illustrated by Mike Grell. It was published a few weeks back in Dark Horse Presents #9.

Part Two  picks up right where Part One left off, with Tarzan rescuing a brunette woman of Opar from a leopard. It turns out this woman isn’t La, but a young priestess named Oona.

She fills Tarzan in on what’s been happening in Opar since the arrival of Sir Richard Kincaid and Wilson via their hot air balloon. The story progresses from there.

Links:

Preview: https://www.darkhorse.com/Comics/Previews/24-124?page=0

Buy The Digital Issue: https://digital.darkhorse.com/profile/5568.dark-horse-presents-9-1/

Comic Shop Locator:  http://www.comicshoplocator.com/storelocator

Mike Grell at ComicBookDB: http://comicbookdb.com/creator.php?ID=1026

Pulp Crazy – Tarzan and The Gods of Opar Part One by Mike Grell

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/105.mp3

In this bonus episode I’m going to be discussing Tarzan and the Gods of Opar, Part One. Tarzan and the Gods of Opar is being serialized over the next 3 months in Dark Horse Presents, beginning this week with Dark Horse Presents #8. The comic has two covers, one with Fred Van Lente’s Weird Detective and the other with a Tarzan cover by Mike Grell.

 

Correction: Mike Grell didn’t write and illustrate Tarzan: The Savage Heart, he illustrated it. Alan Gross wrote it.

Links:

Preview:  https://www.darkhorse.com/Comics/24-123/Dark-Horse-Presents-8

Buy The Digital Issue:  https://digital.darkhorse.com/profile/5493.dark-horse-presents-8/

Comic Shop Locator:  http://www.comicshoplocator.com/storelocator

Mike Grell at ComicBookDB: http://comicbookdb.com/creator.php?ID=1026

Pulp Crazy – Two Hawks From Earth by Philip Jose Farmer

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/098.mp3

This is a bonus episode in celebration of Philip Jose Farmer’s birthday today, he was born on January 26th, 1918. Farmer wrote for the pulps when he was first starting out in the 1950’s, before the pulp magazines disappeared from existence. Long after the pulps died, he continued to write pulp themed tales as novels, in addition to his vast body of work in science fiction. One of these pulp themed or styled novels is Two Hawks From Earth.

It was originally published under the title of The Gate of Time in 1966 (a title Farmer was not pleased with). The story was revised and expanded in 1969 when it was published under the proper title Two Hawks From Earth. Two Hawks From Earth was reprinted in 1985, but I recommend the most recent printing from Monkey Brain Books in 2009 due to the informative afterword by Christopher Paul Carey. Chris goes into Farmer’s aviation experience, Farmer’s science fiction writing, Farmer’s interest in anthropology and linguistics, and the homages in the novel to the works of Edgar Rice Burroughs. Chris also delves into the differences between the original publication, The Gates of Creation and Two Hawks From Earth.

Two Hawks From Earth is often described as an Alternate History novel, but while the spirit of alternate history fiction is in there, the hero of the story Roger Two Hawks actually visits an alternate dimension whose history has played out quite differently.

On this Earth (which is spelled Eorthe), the continent of North America never rose above sea-level. The only evidence of North America are the highest points of our mountain ranges which are a chain of islands on this Earth. Since North America never existed, the Bering Strait Ice Bridge never existed for the ancestors of present day Native American to travel across.

Links:

Purchase Two Hawks From Earth on Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/m3z2qn8

A fanmade map of Eorthe: http://www.alternatehistory.com/discussion/showthread.php?p=208454&highlight=haws#post208454

The Official Philip Jose Farmer Website: http://pjfarmer.com/

The Worlds of Philip Jose Farmer Volume 3: http://meteorhousepress.com/the-worlds-of-jose-farmer-3/

The Philip Jose Farmer International Bibliography: http://rnuninga.home.xs4all.nl/

Christopher Paul Carey’s Website: http://cpcarey.com/

Heidi Ruby Miller’s Website: http://www.heidirubymiller.com/

Pulp Crazy – Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle, Congo Christmas OTR

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/093.mp3

This week Pulp Crazy will be getting into the Christmas Spirit with an Old Time Radio episode starring a pulp character. Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle. This particular episode is titled Congo Christmas and it first aired on 12/20/1951.

This Christmas Themed episode takes place before the Christmas holiday, with Tarzan and his companian N’Kima the monkey vising the village of Karmiki, . Besides the local tribe, the village is home to a Christian Mission run by the Reverend Collier. The beliefs of Christianity are at odds with the native religion led by the High Priest of Neomopo the Moon God. Things are further complicated when two younger members of the tribe from different religions fall in love, and wish to marry. Each of their respective religions are resistant to the marriage. During this conflict, the Eye of Neomopo, a brilliant blue sapphire goes missing, further complicating the climate inside the village.

Links:

ERBZine Article on the Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle Radio Series: http://www.erbzine.com/mag23/2337.html

Old Time Radio Shows on ERBZINE: http://www.erbzine.com/otr/

Christmas Themed Old Time Radio Shows on Archive.org: https://archive.org/details/500OTRChristmasShows

Old Time Radio Lovers Group on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2205196203/

Edgar Rice Burroughs Website: http://www.edgarriceburroughs.com/

 

Ron Marz Interview – John Carter: Warlord of Mars

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Ron Marz is no stranger to comic book readers. Looking at his comicbookdb profile he’s almost run the alphabetical gamut as a writer. Seriously, he’s just missing series with titles starting with K, L, and Y.

 

While his name is most closely associated with Green Lantern (Kyle Rayner to be precise), he’s also written titles featuring pulp or pulp style characters. These include the Batman/Tarzan: Claws of the Cat-Woman mini for DC, Hellboy: Weird Tales #5 for Dark Horse, Conan: The Isle of No Return mini from Dark Horse, The Phantom Annual for Moonstone, and Red Sonja #30 for Dynamite Comics.

His recent foray into the pulp comics world was the mash-up The Shadow Over Innsmouth from Dynamite Entertainment. A trip to Barsoom is currently in the cards for Ron with John Carter: Warlord of Mars from Dynamite Entertainment.

 

Dynamite Entertainment and ERB Inc have reached a mutually beneficial partnership in publishing stories based on the worlds of Edgar Rice Burroughs. Hence the John Carter name in the title. John Carter: Warlord of Mars #1 hit stores last month in November. Issue #2 is due out this Wednesday November 10th. Ron graciously answered some of Pulp Crazy’s questions about the new series.

 

Pulp Crazy: Ron, first let me say thanks for agreeing to the interview during what is no doubt a very busy time. I’ll just jump right into it things. First, I wanted to ask you about The Shadow Over Innsmouth one-shot from Dynamite Entertainment. You wrote that very much in the spirit of The Shadow pulp magazines, without using any of the supernatural elements developed for the radio show or comic books. Was that a conscious effort?

Ron Marz: I wanted to stick with what was essentially a crime story with supernatural overtones. Obviously if you actually bring Cthulhu into the story, the Shadow isn’t really the dominant force in the plot anymore. But more than that, I really wanted to stick to the elements that are in the original “Innsmouth” story. The Elder Gods don’t really rise from the depths and make a big appearance in that story, it’s much more of a mysterious, moody piece.

PC: Speaking of Pulps, when did you first discover Edgar Rice Burroughs and Barsoom? What is your favorite Edgar Rice Burroughs book? Your favorite Edgar Rice Burroughs character?

RM: I discovered all of the Burroughs stuff at just the right age, maybe 11 or 12, and devoured all of it. I think the stuff that you latch onto at that magic age is the stuff that stays with you for the rest of your life. I don’t know that I have one specific favorite book, but the Mars books are my favorite series. And if I had to pick one character as a favorite, I suppose it would be Tarzan, just because he appears in so many more adventures than John Carter.

PC: John Carter: Warlord of Mars, how are you approaching this new series continuity wise? Is it set within a certain period of the Edgar Rice Burroughs original stories, or is this in a new continuity? Can you tease at the plot for the first arc?

RM: I’m not getting overly precious with the continuity in terms of exactly when these stories take place, other than the “classic” period with John and Dejah front and center. Continuity should be a tool a writer uses, not the other way around. I wanted to do a big story for the first arc, so we’re jumping in with a six-issue storyline initially. One of my main goals, in addition to firmly establishing the characters and setting, is to introduce a villain who’s actually worthy of John Carter’s prowess. So in the first issue, we meet Captain Joshua Clark, a Union officer, who is in many ways John Carter’s complete opposite number.

 

PC: Who really is John Carter? One big mystery has always been John Carter’s past. In the original stories he never recalled his childhood. As long as he can remember he has been a fighting man in his physical prime. Do you plan to address this in the new series?

RM: You know, I’ve toyed with the idea of exploring that a bit, but so far I keep coming back to the notion that sometimes it’s good to let a mystery remain a mystery. I think I liked Wolverine better when we didn’t know his past, when his “origin” hadn’t been revealed. Not all stories have to be told.

PC: The covers feature John Carter and Dejah Thoris quite prominently, as well as Tars Tarkas and Woola. Can you give us an idea of who the main cast will be?

RM: You just named them. As far as I’m concerned, those are the characters that the audience wants to read about, and they’re certainly the characters that I want to write about. It’s the same as when I wrote “Star Wars” comics for Dark Horse. I wanted to write stories about Luke and Han and Leia and Darth Vader, not the third Storm Trooper on the left.

PC: Starting with the fourth book in the series, John Carter takes a backseat to new Barsoomian heroes. Will Carthoris, Thuvia and Kantos Kan play any roles? I have to admit my favorite character is Gahan of Gahol, from The Chessmen of Mars, any plans for him to show up?

RM: I’d like to eventually work in all those characters, but my plans for the foreseeable future are to concentrate on John, Dejah and Tars. Honestly, I’ve wanted to write these characters since I was 11 years old, so I’m going to make them my focus.

PC: I hear you are putting the War into Warlord when it comes to this new series. Can you describe the tone of the book? Will this be written as story arcs or serialized single issue stories?

RM: The original novels are full of action — chase scenes, escapes, sword fights. The comics are going to be action-oriented as well. I don’t think anyone is showing up to see John and Dejah have tea. I’m approaching this in much the same manner that I approach anything that I write. It’s all meant to be character-driven, and visually appealing. These are comics. If we’re not giving you something interesting and exciting to look at, you might as well go read a book without any pictures. My plan is to alternate between longer arcs and shorter ones, with some single-issue stories thrown in as well.

PC: What is it like not only Dynamite Entertainment, but also Edgar Rice Buroughs Inc? Can you give us an idea of how the creative process goes? Do both entities have to sign off on plots and story ideas, as well as the finished product?

RM: Both Dynamite and Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc., have given me a pretty free hand with these stories. I have a relationship with ERB, Inc. already, since I’m writing a couple of weekly strips for their website. I’m writing “Korak,” with art by Rick Leonardi, and “The Mucker,” with art by Lee Moder, and coloring on both by Neeraj Menon. The work of Burroughs played a huge part in me wanting to become a writer. So I feel like I’m repaying some of that debt by working on these projects. Being trusted to follow the footsteps of Edgar Rice Burroughs is absolutely an honor.

PC: You are working with Abhishek Malsuni on John Carter: Warlord of Mars, how is Barsoom looking through his lens? What was your first reaction to his interior artwork on the book?

RM: I’m thrilled with what Abhishek and the rest of the art team are doing. I had worked with Abhishek on some projects for the Indian comics market, and even then I felt like his style would be a great fit for John Carter stories. I feel very fortunate that the whole thing has fallen into place. You’ll have to take my word for it, since only the first issue is out so far, but each issue looks better than the previous one.

PC: Anything you want to say to fans of classic Edgar Rice Burroughs characters? Do you think this will be up their alley?

RM: I would hope that fans of Edgar Rice Burroughs are already reading the book, and I hope they’re pleased with what we’re doing. I also hope we’re able to lure in readers who haven’t been exposed to this material before. That’s going to be the real test of what we’re doing, reeling in people who haven’t visited Barsoom previously. I want everybody, old fans and new ones alike.

 

Thanks Ron, and congrats on living out one of your childhood dreams! See you on Barsoom!bombshellcover

Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan Review

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/089.mp3

 

In this weeks episode I will be discussing a movie based on a pulp character. Actually, the most well known pulp character of all. Tarzan. The title of the film is Greystoke, the Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes. It’s quite a mouthful, but I generally hear it referred to as simply Greystoke.

The film was released on March 30, 1984 and is based on the novel Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs. The film was directed by Hugh Hudson, who is best known for directing Chariots of Fire.

Greystoke stars Christopher Lambert as Tarzan, although he is never referred to by this name during the film. He is called John, Johnny, or Lord Greystoke. Andie MacDowell plays Jane Porter, and Ian Holm is Philippe D’Arnot. Sir Ralph Richardson played the Earl of Greystoke, Tarzan’s grandfather.

While the film is not 100% faithful to the original novel, I believe the spirit of Tarzan was captured.

Links:

Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan on Amazon Prime: http://tinyurl.com/o7fdmmj

Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan on Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/nq9meaz

Greystoke @ wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greystoke:_The_Legend_of_Tarzan,_Lord_of_the_Apes

Edgar Rice Burroughs: http://www.edgarriceburroughs.com/

Philip Jose Farmer: http://pjfarmer.com/