Tag Archives: Comics

Pathfinder: Worldscape #1 Annotations

PathFinder: Worldscape #1 Covers
PathFinder: Worldscape #1 Covers

 

Credits:

Script: Erik Mona

Art: Jonathan Lau

Colors: Omi Remalante

Letters: Simon Bowland

Edited by Joseph Rybandt and Anthony Marques

Pathfinder: Worldscape created by Erik Mona

Special Thanks To:

Jim Sullos and Cathy Wilbanks at Edgar Rice Burroughs Inc.

Luke Liberman and Shannon Kingston at Red Sonja LLC

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Page 1

Panel 1:

The Pathfinder Iconics depicted by Wayne Reynolds
The Pathfinder Iconics depicted by Wayne Reynolds

Four of the Pathfinder Universe iconic characters, or Iconics, are battling Thulgroon, from the Pathfinder: City of Secrets comic series.

The scimitar-wielding human cleric is Kyra.

The tattooed white-haired human sorcerer is Seoni.

The leaping dagger-wielding  elven rogue is Merisiel.

The black-haired human fighter with the sword is Valeros.

Page 3

Panel 1:

Sarenrae as depicted by Eva Widermann
Sarenrae as depicted by Eva Widermann

 

Sarenae is a  neutral good deity on the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game’s main world of Golarion; Kyra is one of her clerics.

Page 4

Panel 3:

The pistol-wielding adventurer in a red shirt is Gannus, according to Erik Mona’s Writer’s Commentary on Bleeding Cool, he’s an original character, thought to be from Earth’s Dark Ages.

Jungle Comics #13 featuring Kaanga
Jungle Comics #13 featuring Kaanga

The dirty-blonde-haired guy in the blue vest is De Moire, he’s from Jungle Comics #13 according to Erik Mona, more specifically the Kaanga feature.

Red Sonja: Queen of Plagues
Red Sonja: Queen of Plagues

The red-fishman is Kelgeth, per Erik Mona, he’s a member of a merman race from Gail Simone and Walter Geovani’s Red Sonja arc, Queen of Plagues.

A map of the Hyborian Age
A map of the Hyborian Age

The term Hyborian relates to the Hyborian Age, as created by Robert E. Howard in the original Conan the Cimmerian stories published in Weird Tales during the 1930’s. This is a lost age of Earth’s history set between the time of the sinking of Atlantis and recorded history.

 

Page 5

Panel 1:

An artist's map of Golarion
An artist’s map of Golarion

As mentioned previously, Golarion is the main world of the Pathfinder Role Playing Game.

Panel 2:

Camilla, Queen of the Jungle
Camilla, Queen of the Jungle

“Empress” Camilla is Camilla, Queen of the Jungle, she first appeared in Jungle Comics #1 in June 1940.

Panel 3:

Thun'da by Frank Frazetta and Gardner Fox
Thun’da by Frank Frazetta and Gardner Fox

Shareen is the lost city depicted in the Thun’da comic book by Frank Frazetta and Gardner Fox back in 1952.

Page 7

Panel 2:

Conan as depicted by Cary Nord.
Conan as depicted by Cary Nord.

The Cimmerians are a race of humans from Robert E. Howard’s Hyborian Age. Howard’s most famous creation, Conan the Barbarian is a Cimmerian.  Valerus shares some physical similarities with Conan.

An excellent article on the martial aspects of the Cimmerians: https://www.blackgate.com/2015/10/11/discovering-robert-e-howard-morgan-holmes-on-armies-of-the-hyborian-age-the-cimmerians/

Page 10

Panel 1:

John Carter and Dejah Thoris battle White Apes on Barsoom illustrated by Ken Kelly
John Carter and Dejah Thoris battle White Apes on Barsoom illustrated by Ken Kelly

This creature is a White Ape from Edgar Rice BurroughsJohn Carter of Mars or Barsoom series. They originally appeared in the first book in the series A Princess of Mars.

Page 23

Panel 4:

 

A Thern depicted on the first hardcover edition of The Gods of Mars.
A Thern depicted on the first hardcover edition of The Gods of Mars illustrated by Frank E. Schoonover.

The white-skinned humanoids are White Martians or more specifically, Therns from Edgar Rice BurroughsJohn Carter of Mars or Barsoom series. They originally appeared in Book 2 of the series, The Gods of Mars.

Issus is the self-proclaimed goddess of Barsoom and also appears in The Gods of Mars.

Page 24

Panel 1:

Xanesha as depicted by Andrew Hou
Xanesha as depicted by Andrew Hou

Lady Xanesha is an evil sorcerer who is a native of Golarion. She is of the Lamyros race.

Panel 3:

The Valley of the Death Goddess is possibly a reference to Issus, whom the Therns worship.

Panel 4:

File:Gorilla King.jpg
Gorilla King, Ruthazek by Mauricio Herrera

 

Xanesha mentions an alliance of Empress Camilla’s has barred simians of all kinds from the Shareen Arena.  According to Mona, Issue #2 will introduce us to the other side of the alliance, Gorilla King, Ruthazek from Pathfinder’s own world of Golarion.

Page 25

Panel 5:

Frank Frazetta's depiction of Pha and Thun'da
Frank Frazetta’s depiction of Pha and Thun’da

Pha appeared in the original Thun’da comics by Frank Frazetta and Gardener Fox.

Panel 6:

“I’ve killed three minotaurs, an ogre, a woman made…I think she was part metal.”

I’m not sure who the woman made of metal could be, but it sounds like a reference.

Page 26

Panel 4:

Thun'da by Frank Frazetta and Gardner Fox.
Thun’da by Frank Frazetta and Gardner Fox.

The man who ruled by Pha’s side is none other than Thun’da.

Page 27

Panel 3:

This looks to be a collection of spectators from multiple fictional worlds.  The golden robot looks some-what familiar, but I can’t place him. According to Mona, the shouting guys with helmets are meant to be Red Martians from Barsoom, but there was a coloring mistake.

Panel 4:

Camilla, Queen of the Jungle
Camilla, Queen of the Jungle

The golden-haired woman in a valkyrie-styled helmet is once again, Camilla, Queen of the Jungle.

I’m not sure if her scepter is a reference to anything, or if it’s an original item for this series.

 

Page 28

Panel 1:

Red Sonja as depicted by Frank Thorne
Red Sonja as depicted by Frank Thorne

Enter Red Sonja, the She-Devil with a Sword, based on the heroine first created by Robert E. Howard, Red Sonya of Rogatino in the historical adventure “The Shadow of the Vulture” in the January 1934 issue of Magic Carpet Magazine, adapted into a Hyborian Age comic book character by Roy Thomas and Barry Windsor-Smith in Conan the Barbarian #23 in February 1973.

For more information on the pulp sword-and-sorcery origins of Red Sonja, check out one of my past episodes:

 

 

 

Review: Night’s Dominion #1 by Ted Naifeh

Night's Dominion #1 cover by Ted Naifeh
Night’s Dominion #1 cover by Ted Naifeh

 

Night’s Dominion #1

Written & Illustrated by Ted Naifeh

Lettered by Aditya Bidikar

Edited by Robin Herrera

Designed by Keith Wood

Publisher: Oni Press

Night’s Dominion wasn’t on my radar until a post by a fellow member of the Comic Book Art of Conan the Barbarian Facebook group posted an interview with the creator, Ted Naifeh. The elevator pitch seemed to be superheroes operating in a fantasy world. I thought the concept sounded fairly interesting and the artwork showcased in the interview really sold me on giving it a try.  I made sure to add the book to my pull list at my local comic shop. The release of the first issue kind of snuck up on me, but I was pleasantly surprised to see that it came out this week.

As far as first issues go, this one was pretty solid. We’re introduced to the cast of characters as well as the setting, the medieval-styled city of Umber. I get the impression Umber is a sister city of Fritz Leiber’s Lankhmar and Sanctuary, the primary setting of the Thieves’ World shared universe series.

The first issue does a good job of blending both the fantasy genre and super hero genre (or, at least so far, the urban vigilante sub-genre) together. It introduces us to the main characters via the “adventuring party meets at a tavern or inn” mechanism sometimes used in fantasy role-playing games. While not the most original way to do it, it’s definitely the most convenient way to bring a large, diverse group of characters together quickly.

Members of the party include its leader, a white-haired bard referred to as Maestro, an unnamed “magus” whose specialty is implied to be illusions and parlor tricks, a unnamed young cleric, who is an acolyte of something referred to as the Old Faith, an unnamed assassin from an organization known as the House of the Asps, and the barmaid, Emerane, who is secretly the best thief in the city, moonlighting under the alter ego of the Night.

The Maestro’s plan is for the group to rob the Tower of Uhlume, a temple where the titular King of Oblivion is worshiped. They plan to get to the treasure stores in the tower’s subbasement via a concealed shaft.

Emerane declines the job stating she doesn’t work with amateurs. She leaves the tavern after a brawl erupts, but her and the assassin have a brief martial encounter on her way home and a conversation. But Emerane departs soundlessly, leaving the assassin alone.

Enter the Fury
Enter the Fury

Later in the guise of the Night, Emerane returns a necklace to her stash of stolen loot in the belfry of a chapel and encounters the Fury. He’s the armored Batman-looking figure seen in the preview artwork. They have a brief tussle and conversation before Emerane eludes him. I get a definite Batman and Catwoman vibe from these two. It’s not clear if the Fury is a vigilante or works in some capacity with the government or city watch, but I look forward to learning more about him in future issues.

 

The Fury in pursuit of the Night
The Fury in pursuit of the Night

The next scene shows the cleric returning to his chapel, this is the same one which the Night used as a stash for her loot. City guards are confiscating the hoard as the head priest is crying on the steps. It was mentioned earlier that the Old Faith was hard up for money and it was goons looking to collect from the young cleric that were the catalysts of the tavern brawl.

The final scene shows Emerane, as the Night, meeting the group of adventurers at the arranged meeting spot and agreeing to join in the heist.

This was my first time reading a comic created by Ted Naifeh, but I have to admit, I like what I see. I enjoy the way he renders his characters and his panel to panel storytelling skills shown he’s been illustrating sequential art for some time. The artwork and storytelling get high marks from me.

From a writing perspective, I enjoyed how there wasn’t a lot of info dumping, Naifeh does a good job of layering information subtlety through the course of the story. Such as facts about the politics of Umber, including its royal family. There’s plenty yet to be revealed about the city of Umber and the main cast of characters, though.

This first issue has me intrigued, and I’m on board for at least the first six issues. I wish there were more fantasy comics like this on the stands and I want to do my part in supporting quality comics like this when they do pop up.

Pulp Crazy – Crossover Special – Conan Vs Rune by Barry Windsor-Smith

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/145.mp3

In celebration of the announcement of Sean Lee Levin’s Crossovers Expanded Volumes 1 and 2 to be released this summer by Meteor House, this week is a special crossover themed episode. I’ll be discussing Conan Vs Rune by Barry Windsor-Smith, where the Cimmerian battles the Dark God. This is a one-shot comic book published by Marvel Comics in 1995. It is likely never going to be collected or reprinted due to the rights surrounding the two characters. Win Scott Eckert included it in Crossovers: A Secret Chronology of the World Volume 1.

Links:

Purchase Crossovers by Win Scott Eckert: http://www.blackcoatpress.com/crossovers.htm

Preorder Crossovers Expanded by Sean Lee Levin: http://meteorhousepress.com/crossovers

The Crossover Universe (TM) Blog: www.crossoveruniverse.com

The Wold Newton Family Website: http://woldnewtonfamily.com

Barry Windsor-Smith Official Website: http://barrywindsor-smith.com/

Win Scott Eckert Website: www.winscoteckert.com

The Swords of Robert E. Howard Forum: http://swordsofreh.proboards.com/

Conan at Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conan_the_Cimmerian

Rune at Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rune_(comics)

Pulp Crazy – Tarzan and the Gods of Opar Part Two by Mike Grell

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/110.mp3

In this weeks episode I’m going to be discussing Tarzan and the Gods of Opar Part Two written and illustrated by Mike Grell. It was published a few weeks back in Dark Horse Presents #9.

Part Two  picks up right where Part One left off, with Tarzan rescuing a brunette woman of Opar from a leopard. It turns out this woman isn’t La, but a young priestess named Oona.

She fills Tarzan in on what’s been happening in Opar since the arrival of Sir Richard Kincaid and Wilson via their hot air balloon. The story progresses from there.

Links:

Preview: https://www.darkhorse.com/Comics/Previews/24-124?page=0

Buy The Digital Issue: https://digital.darkhorse.com/profile/5568.dark-horse-presents-9-1/

Comic Shop Locator:  http://www.comicshoplocator.com/storelocator

Mike Grell at ComicBookDB: http://comicbookdb.com/creator.php?ID=1026

Pulp Crazy – Tarzan and The Gods of Opar Part One by Mike Grell

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/105.mp3

In this bonus episode I’m going to be discussing Tarzan and the Gods of Opar, Part One. Tarzan and the Gods of Opar is being serialized over the next 3 months in Dark Horse Presents, beginning this week with Dark Horse Presents #8. The comic has two covers, one with Fred Van Lente’s Weird Detective and the other with a Tarzan cover by Mike Grell.

 

Correction: Mike Grell didn’t write and illustrate Tarzan: The Savage Heart, he illustrated it. Alan Gross wrote it.

Links:

Preview:  https://www.darkhorse.com/Comics/24-123/Dark-Horse-Presents-8

Buy The Digital Issue:  https://digital.darkhorse.com/profile/5493.dark-horse-presents-8/

Comic Shop Locator:  http://www.comicshoplocator.com/storelocator

Mike Grell at ComicBookDB: http://comicbookdb.com/creator.php?ID=1026

Legends of Log Giant Size 2015 Annual Kickstarter & Interview

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D.L. Suharski is the creator and writer of Legends of Log. It’s a sword & sorcery comic and prose series starring a giant ax wielding log. The Kickstarter is underway here: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/573814937/legends-of-log-giant-size-annual

I also embedded the video for the Kickstater above.

D.L. was kind enough to answer some questions about Legends of Log and the Kickstarter campgain for the Giant Size 2015 annual. We also discuss some of his influences.

 

logandthe ax1

PC: So what’s the deal with Legends of Log? Did you receive some type of prophetic vision of Guardians of the Galaxy hitting big, and then proceeded to create your own wood-based hero to rival the great Groot? Seriously, where did you come up with such a crazy concept of a giant log with an ax? How would you describe the character?

Log doesn’t compare to the great Groot, but the mighty Log does have his advantages. He carries a giant ax. So If they were to do battle, I’m pretty sure Log would be doing some heavy swinging.


As for the idea, I came up with the concept of Log and his legends from a comic strip that I’ve been drawing since 2010. In the comic strip is a humorous talking log. He doesn’t carry an ax or anything like that. He’s just there to take the brunt of the jokes and punchlines tossed at him.


Anyhow, In 2012, I imagined taking this character I had been drawing and changing him into a bigger and stronger log. A log that carried an ax and lived back in the days of  the dark age. And is he big! He’s a giant compared to humans. I would describe him as the strong silent type. But when he gets mad, watch out!

 

logpreviewattack

PC: I’m getting a big sword and sorcery vibe from these Legends of Log images. Do you have any favorite pulp characters or creators that may have influenced your work with Legends of Log?

Log is mostly inspired by Conan the Barbarian books and comics. Along with others like Thongor, Brak the Barbarian, Kull the Destroyer and all those other types of characters. I read a lot of paperback books of sword and sorcery when I was a kid. From all the famous fantasy authors like Lin Carter, Andrew Oufftt, Michael Moorcock, Jack Vance, John Jakes, Fritz Leiber and of course, Robert E. Howard.

 

LOLA1page8

PC: Tell us a little bit about the world Legends of Log takes place in.

Log’s world is not that big. It’s mostly the size of a very large island with a lot of UN-known lands beyond that. Which makes it nice to expand if I ever decide to make Log’s world bigger. But right now it consist of the North Woods – where Log lives. The South Woods – where the angry Ax men hold a grudge. The Dark Woods – where warlocks and sorcerers conjure up dark magic. The Sea of Oceans, – where Mermaids and giant Krakens dwell. The Wildlands – a savage jungle that is lost in time, and the Outlands. – where beast and creatures roam. All these places are covered by the dark gloom of dark spells and sorcery created within the Dark Woods. And it’s are all after one thing. A living breathing giant chunk of wood called Log.

logpromo0000

PC: For those of us who haven’t read Legends of Log before, how would you describe the tone of the series? Is it straight sword and sorcery? Is there any comedy?

 

Although 90 percent of it is sword and sorcery. I did throw in some savage jungle girl stories where Log meets a girl named Corra from the Wildlands.
As for comedy, well… I think the fact that since Log is a log and he carries an ax and yells, “TIMBERRRRR!” May say it all.

 

LOGsamplepageDarkgrim1

PC: I took a look around your website and saw that you have produced three comics and two prose books pertaining to Legends of Log so far. Does the Legends of Log Giant Size 2015 Annual include all new material?

The book does include new material including three stories from the previous mini comics.

PC: Are there multiple tales in the annual? Are the stories in the annual self-contained? Do readers need to pick up past issues or books or can we jump right in here?

There are ten tales all together and they are all self-contained. The reader doesn’t have to read any other previous books or comics to enjoy the stories. But some of the stories do give hints and clues to a bigger story that will eventually happen to the mighty Log. And I can’t wait to tell that story. But it won’t happen till we get further down the road with the annuals.

PC: The Kickstarter campaign for the Legends of Log Giant Size 2014 Annual is underway and will be active until October 6, 2014. I see you have a variety of tiers, from a price friendly PDF of the issue to some higher tiers, where a limited number of backers get to take part in the comics creation. I think there is a tier there for everybody who is interested in a fun sword & sorcery book. Do you have anything to say in closing to prospective backers out there who are fans of pulp and sword & sorcery?

I’m a big fan of the pulp era and of sword & sorcery. The whole Legends of Log book is based on action and adventure. And although it may have a small extra punch of humor that you may not find in your normal S&S. I really think you might get a kick out of this book. I mean come-on, A log with an ax? What could be funner than that.

PC: Thanks for answering my questions. I look forward to seeing the finished product.

Thanks Jason for giving me the Opportunity. Keep up the great work on Pulp Crazy.

 

Links:

Legends of Log 2015 Giant Size Annual Kickstarter: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/573814937/legends-of-log-giant-size-annual

Legends of Log Website: http://www.legendsoflog.com

Legends of Log Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/legendsoflog

 

log&firebeast

Pulp Crazy – Bigfoot Sword of the Earthman

 

 

http://pulpcrazy.com/podcast/079.mp3

 

In this weeks episode I will be discussing Bigfoot Sword of the Earthman, a six issue comic book mini series published by BrewHouse Comics. The comic is written by Josh S. Henaman with line art by Andy Taylor and colors by Thomas Bonvillain. The first issue came out in November 2012 and the sixth issue was recently published in August 2014. This is a sword and planet as well as a sword and sorcery comic. It’s very much in the vein of Edgar Rice Burroughs and Robert E. Howard. One of the tag lines I saw floating around in the promotional materials was Sword, Sorcery and Sasquatch.

 

The premise of the book is that a group of mages on Mars summoned Bigfoot to the Red Planet from Earth. The mute brute is enslaved at first, but later escapes. His tag-along/partner is Castor, a member of the scribe caste elite. They seem to be the bards and storytellers of Mars. He sees Bigfoot, (who is known only as the Earthman among the inhabiatants of Mars), as his meal ticket. However things don’t go according to plan, Mars is ruled by a heavy handed tyrant named Lord Jeoffa. Doing Lord Jeoffa’s dirty work is my favorite character of the series, Korovan Muspin, a red skinned reptilian barbarian who is more than a physical match with the Earthman. There is a really cool four page origin story for Muspin in the final four pages of issue #1, that puts a unique spin on what goes on in a Martian Rookery.

 

Links:

Brewhouse Comics Online Store: http://brewhousecomics.storenvy.com/

Stores that carry Bigfoot Sword of the Earthman: http://www.bigfootcomic.blogspot.com/p/s.html

Bigfoot Sword of the Earthman Site: http://www.bigfootcomic.blogspot.com/

Cast of Characters: http://www.bigfootcomic.blogspot.com/p/bigfoot-sote-cast-of-characters.html

Bigfoot Sword of the Earthman Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/BigfootSwordoftheEarthman

Josh S. Henaman Twitter: https://twitter.com/JoshSHenaman

Andy Taylor Twitter: https://twitter.com/AndyETaylor

Tamra Bonvillain: https://twitter.com/TBonvillain

 

Pulp Crazy – The Shadow #0

In this weeks episode I will be discussing The Shadow #0 published by Dynamite Entertainment. This issue came into comic shops this week and features The Shadow training with Harry Houdini. The issue is written by Cullen Bunn and illustrated by Colton Worley. Marc Rueda provided the colors and Rob Steen was the letterer.

The issue takes place in two separate time periods. One portion is set in New York City in 1925 with Lamont Cranston being trained in the art of escape by Harry Houdini. Another portion takes place in Los Angeles in 1936 with The Shadow venturing into the lair of the Society of United Magicians to save Houdini’s kidnapped widow, Bess. Combining The Shadow and Houdini is a great idea. Walter Gibson, the creator of the pulp Shadow was a magician himself and ghost wrote for Houdini. Houdini himself was also a credited pulp writer. He is credited for writing the story Under the Pyramids for the 50th Anniversary issue of Weird Tales. In reality this was ghost written by H.P. Lovecraft based on an idea by Houdini.

Links:

The Shadow #0 on Comixology: https://www.comixology.com/The-Shadow-0-Digital-Exclusive-Edition/digital-comic/123660ht

Cullen Bunn at ComicDB: http://comicbookdb.com/creator.php?ID=9802

Cullen Bunn at Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/l3zpdqw

Colton Worley at ComicDB: http://comicbookdb.com/creator.php?ID=14462

Colton Worley at Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/muenb7v

Walter B. Gibson: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_B._Gibson

Houdini: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Houdini